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Content

Uniqueness of Content

 

Probably one of the most difficult aspects especially since it requires rising above the crowd and spotting content potential all the time. However it also shows an ability and willingness to constantly learn and enquire what is of value to your online audience. From the research, I have detected 3 ways of generating unique content; generated by the owner of the site; generated by external actors; and generated by the users themselves.

The Six Elements of Great Content

The past couple of months I have been researching user behaviour on websites and more specifically what makes people visit and revisit a site. I have been looking at sites about music, cooking, pets, legal issues, arts, software development, education, games, kids, infants, parenthood, books, journalism, heritage, history, medicine, gardening, finance…you name it, I have probably looked at it.

Working with images on the OLnet site

Working with images in your blog posts or pages in the OLnet site has up until now been a little bit tricky. To make life a little easier a new module has been added to the site called IMCE. When you first start working with IMCE you might find it takes a little getting used to, but hopefully after using it for a while it will enhance your experience of creating content for the site.

TwHistory: What would Churchill have tweeted during World War II

Twitter initially started as a micro-blogging service, but quickly developed into a social messaging tool used effectively to quickly communicate messages to a group or several different groups of people.

"Among the Highest Aims of Scholarship: Entertainment" - Creating the Smarthistory.org OER without abandoning the student

Sunday afternoon. Keep checking my watch. Just logged onto Skype to have a discussion about the experience of creating Smarthistory.org, a multi-award winning Open Educational Resource with founders, Drs Steven Zucker and Beth Harris. Dr Steven Zucker is a specialist in 19th and 20th-century art and theory and is Dean of the School of Graduate Studies at the Fashion Institute of Technology. He has received awards for excellence in teaching and authors essays and articles in prestigious art history journals. With Dr. Beth Harris, he created the FIT digital image library and organized conferences on technologies reshaping the practice of teaching art and art history. Dr Beth Harris was an assistant professor of art history at the Fashion Institute of Technology when she created Smarthistory with Dr. Zucker. She has taught both online and in the classroom and also directed FIT's large distance learning program. She is currently Director of Digital Learning at a museum in New York City. Beth is a Victorian Studies specialist and editor of Famine and Fashion: Needlewomen in the Nineteenth Century (2005). With  Steven Zucker, she co- authored "The Slide Library: A Posthumous Assessment in the Service of Our Digital Future,” in Teaching Art History with Technology: Case Studies (2008).

Why Content is Still King

M and M sweets
Photo courtesy of Grfx_Guru / Flickr

The past couple of months I have been researching user behaviour on websites and more specifically what makes people visit and revisit a site. I have been looking at sites about music, cooking, knitting, pets, legal issues, arts, software development, education, games, kids, infants, parenthood, books, journalism, heritage, history, medicine, gardening, finance…you name it, I have probably looked at it. During this initial research, I was looking to spot patterns in user behaviour through analytics provided by Alexa and Google, including site linking, driving traffic to the site data, site reach, bounce percentage, the time user time spent on the site etc. There is a minority of sites that have no ranking or retain their analytics from public view, so I haven’t been able to assess these sites.

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