About OLnet

OLnet is an international research hub for aggregating, sharing, debating and improving Open Educational Resources (OERs). See Development of OLnet and OLnet progress for further information. 

OLnet offers:

Olnet conversationsParticipation in the OER Community

Members of the OLnet team have taken part in many Conferences, Workshops and Events.  There has also been active participation in the online community through blog posts, Twitter and other social networks.

OLnet Team

See the Team page for information about who is behind the OLnet project.

 

 

Development of OLnet

Funding

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has supported the development of this project from March 2009 to April 2012. The project aimed to bring researchers and educators together in an intelligent social network to share knowledge on the development of Open Educational Resources (OER).

Partners

Run by The Open University, UK and Carnegie Mellon University, USA – two major advocates of equalising access to higher education – the aim was to use collective intelligence to identify the big questions. Going beyond the universally available technologies for mass collaboration such as wikis, forums and blogs, the network will analyse community contributions to gain insights from debate and move idea generation towards innovative practice. Research focussed on the most urgent educational needs across the globe – from how OER are most effectively used in developing countries to working out how anyone can gain qualifications from free access to university course content online.

Claims garden by olnetchannel, on Flickr

History

Since 2000, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation have spent around $80 million on kick-starting the OER movement, encouraging some major players like MIT and The Open University to provide proof of concept projects like MITOCW and OpenLearn. Globally, over 150 universities are already engaged in the OER movement. The next step is to encourage more Higher Education institutions to exploit the knowledge gained in this ’start-up’ phase, making free access to HE resources universally available. The challenge will also be to stress-test current knowledge, using emerging technologies to improve on community generated ideas. (Image: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License by  olnetchannel )

OER movement

With the growing rise in access to the internet and governments beginning to sponsor OER, the time is right for growth. Establishing an evidence base and research framework for the emerging field is essential. The key challenge for OLnet has been making sure the lessons learnt are taken forward into OER projects as the movement grows, and the production of OER remains leading edge whilst becoming commonplace.

OLnet progress

OLnet design workshop by openpad, on Flickr

OLnet has five key areas of operation:

  1. Management
  2. Fellowships
  3. Infrastructure
  4. Research
  5. Dissemination

The operation of OLnet as a two-site project is based on a loose coupling of operations with a shared set of motivations and targets.  The fellowship and infrastructure elements are based at the OU while research projects, dissemination and management take place across the partnership.  Communications between partners are facilitated by shared participation in events and the use of conferencing between project managers and other staff.  At the OU, a steering group has been established linked to internal support for research & scholarship. (Image: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License by openpad)

End of year 2 progress (February 2011)

Across these five areas OLnet has focussed on:

  • consolidation of projects as coherent strands of activity
  • visiting fellowships including two rounds of open recruitment
  • producing a viable set of tools for collective intelligence and applying them to the analysis of previous projects (linked to separately funded analysis of the Hewlett Grantee reports)
  • completion of primary research in learning design and participatory learning
  • dissemination of academic outputs through publications and conferences

The dissemination approach for OLnet is based on presence in events, academic publication through conferences and papers, development of online presence, and specific dissemination events.  Using targeted events, where OLnet offers a high level of presence, sponsors particular activities or uses Cloudworks and team blogging to increase persistence continues to be a successful strategy.  Publications figures are very good with over 69 peer-reviewed publications or presentations that have been registered in The Open University's Open Research Online database at the end of February 2011.

The project has changed the way in which we consider the overall web presence of OLnet to include activity on the Cloudworks and Cohere sites as part of a move away from building a separate OLnet community.  During the final year of the project we are moving further towards use of OLnet.org as a dissemination site.

 

OLnet team

The following people have been involved in the OLnet project:

Project co-directors: Patrick McAndrew, The Open University and Candace Thille, Carnegie Mellon University

Members of OLnet team at a Cohere training workshopOther team members The Open University, UK

  • Andreia Inamorato Dos Santos, OLnet Research Associate
  • Ann Jones, Senior Lecturer
  • Anna De Liddo, OLnet Research Associate: Collective Intelligence Infrastructure
  • Anna Page, IET Client Relations Officer
  • Canan Blake, Research Fellow
  • Chris Pegler, Senior Lecturer
  • Doug Clow, Lecturer Interactive Media Development 
  • Elpida Makriyannis, OLnet Research Associate
  • Eileen Scanlon, Professor of Educational Technology
  • Freda Wolfenden, Senior Lecturer, FELS
  • Gary Elliott-Cirigottis, Business Improvement and Programme Manager
  • Giota Alevizou, OLnet Research Associate
  • Grainne Conole, Professor of E-Learning
  • Janet Dyson, OLnet Project Co-ordinator
  • Karen Cropper, OLnet Project & Liaison Manager
  • Kasia Kozinska, Research Student (Charter studentship)
  • Liam Green-Hughes, Web Developer
  • Michelle Bachler, Web Developer: Collective Intelligence Infrastructure
  • Natalie Eggleston, OLnet Project Co-ordinator
  • Nick Freear, Application Programmer/web Developer
  • Patrina Law, IET Senior Learning & Teaching Development Manager 
  • Rob Farrow, OLnet Research Communication Officer
  • Sara Crowe, Project Support Manager 
  • Simon Buckingham Shum, Senior Lecturer In Knowledge Media 
  • Tina Wilson, OLnet Research Fellow
  • Will Woods,  Senior Learning and Teaching Technologies Manager, IET

Other Team Members, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

  • Renée Fisher, Course Developer and Assistant Project Manager, Open Learning Initiative at Carnegie Mellon University
  • Jim Greeno, Visiting Professor, School of Education, University of Pittsburgh, USA
  • John Rinderle, OLI Senior Software Engineer, CMU, USA
  • Marlene Scardamalia, Presidents' Chair in Education & Knowledge Technologies at OISE/University of Toronto; Co-founder and Director of IKIT--the Institute for Knowledge Innovation and Technology (http://ikit.org)
  • Joel Smith, Vice Provost and Chief Information Officer, CMU, USA
  • Chris Teplovs, University of Toronto, Canada

OLnet Fellows (for more detail see OLnet Fellows Page)

  • Ágnes Sándor, Xerox Research Centre Europe, France
  • Anuradha Gungadeen, Mauritius Institute of Education, Mauritius
  • Cathy Casserly, Carnegie Foundation, USA
  • Charles Severance, University of Michigan, USA
  • David Wiley, Brigham Young University, USA
  • Dele Yaya, National Teachers Institute, Nigeria
  • Doris Kaije, Kyambogo University, Uganda
  • Elsebeth Sorensen, Aarhus University, Denmark
  • Engin Kursun, Middle East Technical University, Turkey
  • Fred Keraro, Egerton University, Kenya
  • George Siemens, Complexive Systems Inc, Canada
  • Helen Jelfs, University of Bristol, UK
  • Jenny Preece, University of Maryland, USA
  • José Luis Fernández Vindel, Universidad Nacional de Educacin a Distancia (UNED), Spain
  • Juliana Bbuye, Makerere University, Uganda
  • Marcela Maina, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain
  • Markus Deimann, FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany
  • Murilo Matos Medonca, UNISUL - Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina, Brazil
  • Pauline Ngimwa, The Open University, UK
  • Pritee Auckloo, Mauritius Institute of Education, Mauritius
  • Robyn Muldoon, University of New England, Australia
  • Sandhya Gunness, University of Mauritius, Mauritius
  • Sandra Wills, University of Wollongong, Australia
  • Scott Leslie, BCCampus, Canada
  • Susan D'Antoni, UNESCO, Canada
  • Svetlana Knyazeva, UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies, Russia
  • Yannis Dimitriadis, University of Valladolid, Spain
  • Yimin Jia, South China Normal University (SCNU), China

Website administration

Website administrators are currently: Karen Cropper, OLnet Liaison Manager, Anna Page, IET Client Relations Officer and Michelle Bachler, Web Developer.  Original set up of site and development up to the end of August 2010 was by Liam Green-Hughes, Web Developer and Nick Freear, Application Programmer/web Developer. Modifications to the site early 2012 by Michelle Bachler and Anna Page. 

 

OLnet fellows

The OLnet Fellowship scheme is closed. The OLnet project is not currently recruiting any more Fellows.

 

Introduction

OLnet fellowships were offered for researchers and practitioners who wished to contribute to the understanding of Open Educational Resource (OER) design and use worldwide. There were three rounds of open competition.  Details of the application procedure for reference are still on the website, but no more Fellows are planned to be recruited at this stage in the project.  Below is a list of the Fellows who were supported by OLnet.  In addition there was one intake of OLnet-TESSA Fellows who are listed separately here: /content/about-olnet/olnet-tessa-fellows.

OLnet Fellows

 

Fellow 

Cathy Casserly (USA) - collaborative discussion to develop an approach to mapping the field of OER
More info | Other info

Fellow 

Susan D'Antoni (Canada) - continuing on from Cathy Casserly in mapping the OER field
More info | Other info

Markus Diemann OLnet Fellow 

Markus Deimann (Germany) - exploring and mapping educational benefits and theoretical approaches of OER
More info | Other info

Fellow 

Yannis Dimitriadis (Spain) - worked on use of patterns to encourage collaboration around OER
More info | Other info

OLnet Fellow José Luis Fernández Vindel  

José Luis Fernández Vindel (Spain) - Developing a diagrammatic language to build and share STEM teaching narratives
More info | Other info

Olnet Fellow Sandhya Gunness 

Sandhya Gunness (Mauritius) - gathering information about OER and OEP to inform stakeholders in developing countries
More info | Other info

Helen Jelfs OLnet Fellow 

Helen Jelfs (Bristol, UK) - collection of resources in Cohere around Deeper Learning
More info | Other info

Jia Yimin OLnet Fellow 

Jia Yimin (China) - large scale work in China around sharing courses
More info | Other info

OLnet Fellow Svetlana Knyazeva 

Svetlana Knyazeva (Russia) - UNESCO study of OER in the CIS and other non-English speaking countries
More info | Other info

OLnet Student Kasia Kozinska 

Kasia Kozinska (Poland) - CASE studentship at The Open University, UK, studying lifelong learners using OER
More info | Other info

Engin Kursun OLnet Fellow 

Engin Kursun (Turkey) - research to inform decision-makers in Turkey by developing a policy framework for OER
More info | Other info

Scott Leslie OLnet Fellow 

Scott Leslie (Canada) -  prototyped a way to enable tracking of downloaded OER
More info | Other info

Sheila MacNeil OLnet Fellow 

Sheila MacNeill (UK) - funded to attend the OCWC Global 2009 in Mexico and report back OLnet Team
More info | Other info

Fellow 

Marcelo Maina (Catalonia, Spain) - work on changed approaches to teaching using OER
More info | Other info

Fellow 

Murilo Matos Mendonça (Brazil) - work on influence, OER policy context in particular relation to Brazil
More info | Other info

Robyn Muldoon OLnet Fellow 

Robyn Muldoon (Australia) - investigated assessment practices in higher education in Great Britain
More info | Other info

OLnet Fellow Pauline Ngimwa 

Pauline Ngimwa (Kenya) - Student at The Open University, UK, funded to visit Africa to review the OER Readiness in Africa.
More info | Other info

Jenny Preece OLnet Fellow 

Jennifer Preece (USA) - social structures, worked with Elpida Makriyannis on study of social learning in OER
More info | Other info

Fellow 

Ágnes Sándor (France) - from Xerox, automated analysis of texts to pick out the messages around OER
More info | Other info

Fellow 

Chuck Severance (USA) - highly technical work to integrate standards exchange into Moodle
More info | Other info

George Siemens OLnet Fellow 

George Siemens (Canada) - preparatory work for setting up Change: Education, Learning, and Technology MOOC
More info | Other info

OLnet Fellow Elsebeth Sorensen 

Elsebeth Sorensen (Denmark) - creativity and innovation and how it relates to openness, special issue of journal
More info | Other info

Fellow 

David Wiley (USA) - consideration of validity of claims about the benefits of OER
More info | Other info

Fellow 

Sandra Wills (Australia) - integrating role play frameworks with D4L Programme, set up collaborative space in Cloudworks
More info | Other info

 

 

Cathy Casserly

P1010987 by Karen Cropper, on Flickr
Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License  by  Karen Cropper 

Name

Cathy Casserly

Project Title

Mapping the OER Eco-system

Project Summary

Cathy Casserly’s goal as an OLnet Expert Fellow was to conceptualize and build version 1.0 of a Program Improvement Map for the field of Open Educational Resources (OER). She was aiming to build on and apply lessons learned from the field of healthcare improvement.  The Program Improvement Map is an analytic tool developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement to share the most up-to-date knowledge about the science of performance improvement for healthcare. In addition to creating the map, she was seeking to develop the proposed processes for continued iteration of the map by the OER community.

Dates visited OU UK

29 November to 3 December 2010

Institution

At the time of Fellowship, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
At the time of writing, CEO of Creative Commons.

Biographic information

Cathy’s career is dedicated to openness, and particularly to leveraging possibilities at the boundaries of formal and informal learning to equalize educational opportunity. She has been a long-time advocate of open educational resources (OER). As the Director of the OER Initiative at The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation she managed investments totalling more than $100 million to harness the efficiency and effectiveness of knowledge sharing worldwide.

At the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Cathy spearheaded work in the areas of transparency and technology as a Senior Partner and the Vice President of Innovation and Open Networks. With the extended Carnegie team she launched a continuous performance improvement system to create alternative mathematics pathways for community college students.

Cathy has been instrumental in supporting many young organizations and currently sits on the Startl board, the Peer-2-Peer University board and serves on the advisory committee for MIT OpenCourseWare and the University of the People. She earned her Ph.D. in the economics of education from Stanford University and a B.A. in mathematics from Boston College.

Main Output

Cathy explored options to “map” OER in ways that would help get the community behind a joint mission. Setting out the principles for such a map during the Fellowship she identified as an important intention is to form the right seeds for a map to emerge where everyone can locate find their "place in the ecosystem". These ideas were presented at OCWC Global 2011: Celebrating 10 years of OpenCourseWare conference in May 2011 and are reflected in the development of the OLnet Evidence Hub and the work of Susan D'Antoni.

Outputs

  • Joint paper presented at the OCWC Global 2011 Conference

References

McAndrew, Patrick; Makriyanni, Elpida; Casserly, Cathy and Vollmer, Timothy (2011). Planning the OER landscape. In: OCWC Global 2011: Celebrating 10 years of OpenCourseWare, 04–06 May 2011, Cambridge, MA, USA. http://oro.open.ac.uk/31484/

Susan D'Antoni

Name

Susan D'Antoni

Project Title

Collaborative mapping of the landscape of institutional OER initiatives

Project Summary

The focus of Susan's OLnet Fellowship was on developing a prototype of a visual geographic map of OER initiatives listing them by institution and, country. She worked with Elpida Makriyannis and Teresa Connolly, aiming to build upon the work that Cathy Casserly did while at OLnet, and engaging with the OER Community, IIEP/ UNESCO, UOC, and the Chair partners.

The premise is that it would be timely and useful to conduct a mapping of the global OER landscape of national and institutional initiatives.  Such a map would indicate the scale and scope of the OER movement and constitute an important resource for awareness raising and networking.  The map is first and foremost aimed at the OER Community. And a collaborative mapping engaging the OER Community would promote ownership.

Dates visited OU UK

4-16 July 2011 and 19-27 September 2011

Institution

Athabasca University, Canada

Biographic information

Susan is Advisor to the President, International OER Initiatives at Athabasca University.  Previously she was Programme Specialist for the International Institute for Educational Planning/UNESCO.

Over the course of her career, Susan D'Antoni has been actively involved in both adult and higher education and often in activities related to information, working both in her own country, Canada, but also at the International Association of Universities and UNESCO in Paris. Some of the projects she worked on include a survey of correspondence education in Canada, developing a simulated search database on continuing professional education at the University of Toronto's OISE (Ontario Institute for Studies in Education), managing the distance education programmes at the Ryerson University in Toronto and leading the Projections and Analysis Section in the Education Division at Statistics Canada. Susan recalls her time at Statistics Canada as a particularly exciting time with a number of occasional surveys on education. She also headed the Research, Policy and Planning Division at the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada where she initiated an analytic statistical publication, Trends, for university managers.

Susan believes that involvement in the OER movement is not merely a privilege, but a responsibility, that sharing will contribute to making knowledge open, accessible and useful.  A favourite book, The Library at Night by Alberto Manguel, inspired her to reflect on the concept of the universal library, which she raised in her keynote speech on OER at The Cambridge International Conference on Open and Distance Learning 2009.

Interested in information dissemination and open knowledge, Susan believes that after a decade of development, it is time to map the scale of what is going on within the OER movement worldwide, a process that must be collaborative and owned by the OER community at large.

Main Output

A prototype map for discussion and reflection by interested members of the OER community at large.

Outputs

  • Prototype global map based upon OCWC data
  • Initial outline of the consultation process with the OER Community and a list of the partners to be involved

References

D’Antoni, S (2009), ‘Open Educational Resources: Building Knowledge Societies’. http://www2.open.ac.uk/r06/documents/RethinkingInclusion.pdf

Kozinska, K (2011), 'Susan D’Antoni: Open Educational Resources (OER) as a universal responsibility’, olnet.org, 21 July [online], http://olnet.org/node/612  (Accessed 13 December 2011).

Update Since Fellowship

The prototype map will be released during the first annual Open Education Week from 5-10 March 2012.  All those interested will be invited to take part in a subsequent online discussion.

Markus Deimann

Markus Diemann Olnet Fellow

Image captured from video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3U7z777DAs

Name

Dr. Markus Deimann

Project Title

Open educational resources and educational theories: Bridging the gap

Project Summary

The research project focuses on exploring and mapping educational benefits and theoretical approaches of OER. It addresses questions such as: “Which educational theories and concepts seem appropriate to analyse OER?” However, it is important to note that the project does not intent to develop a somewhat “new” (i.e., comprehensive) theory of OER. Instead it is aimed at facilitating theory building that can help to establish OER in educational settings.

Markus is working as a work package leader of the project “Innovative OER in European Higher Education”. Overall, this research project contributes to an emerging issue of OER:  Current discussions neglect systematic examinations concerning the relationship between objectives of OER, actual practice, and educational theories. The results of the project are directly related to the OER-HE project with FernUniversität and the OUUK as partners.

Dates visited OU UK

5 to 30 September 2011

Institution

FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany

Biographic information

Dr. Markus Deimann, M.A., has been Research Assistant in the Department of Instructional Technology & Media, with Prof. Dr. Bastiaens, at the FernUniversität Hagen since May, 2006. He completed his studies of educational sciences and political sciences at the University of Mannheim with a Master’s degree. After that he became Research Assistant in the BMBF-Project “Multimediales Fernstudium Medizinische Informatik (MEDIN)” at the University of Technology Ilmenau and at the University of Erfurt. Furthermore, for one year, he became a Visiting Scholar at the Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.

Dr. Deimann works as a peer reviewer for the journal “e-learning and education (eleed)” as well as for various international conferences (e.g. openlearn).  His research interests are E-learning, Instructional Technology and Media, instructional design, motivation, volition.

His teaching experience includes supervision of Modules of the Master’s Degree Program “Bildung und Medien: eEducation” (Beginning: Winter semester 2008/09)

Main Output

“I wanted feedback for my research projects and claims that I want to make and I was strongly encouraged to keep going with my research.”

Outputs

  • In-depth interviews with experts from the OUUK.
  • Presentation at SCORE Fellows meeting and participation in activities with SCORE Fellows
  • Attended SCORE Workshop on Creative Commons licensing
  • Set up own blog (http://markusmind.wordpress.com/).
  • Started to scoop the I-net: http://www.scoop.it/t/offene-bildung
  • Developed an online survey
  • Joined MOOC #change11 and recorded introduction video

References

Deimann, M (2011), “The challenge to implement OER in institutional contexts #change11”, markusmind, 26 October [online], http://markusmind.wordpress.com/2011/10/26/the-challenge-to-implement-oer-in-institutional-contexts-change11/ (Accessed 22 Feb 2012).

Deimann, M (2011), “SCORE Fellowship Workshop”, markusmind, 30 September [online], http://markusmind.wordpress.com/2011/09/30/score-fellowship-workshop/ (Accessed 22 Feb 2012)

Deimann, M (2011), “Survey on Use of OER”, markusmind, 27 September [online], http://markusmind.wordpress.com/2011/09/27/survey-on-use-of-oer/ (Accessed 22 Feb 2012)

Deimann, M (2011), “SCORE Workshop on CreativeCommons”, 16 September [online], http://markusmind.wordpress.com/2011/09/16/score-workshop-on-creativecommons/ (Accessed 22 Feb 2012)

“My introduction to the MOOC #change11” (2011) YouTube video, added by markusmind [online], http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3U7z777Das (Accessed 22 Feb 2012)

Update Since Fellowship

“My OLnet fellowship was at the beginning of my research journey and I am now more confident that I am on the right track.”

 

Yannis Dimitriadis

Name

Yannis Dimitriadis

Project Title

Creation and sharing of collaborative learning designs within the Open Educational Resources cycle.

Project Summary

Yannis Dimitriadis was the first OLnet fellow and visited the Open University, UK, near the start of the project.  Yannis was part funded by OLnet and part by University of Valladolid. Yannis came to OLnet with an established expertise in pedagogic patterns that he was then able to apply to the field of OER. He worked with Gráinne Conole on the way in which patterns can feed into designs for OER.

The work recognised how OER provided examples (or Mediating Artefacts) to help people understand designs and then how patterns could be used to help inspire those who were trying to make use of OER. As part of his fellowship an approach was piloted that takes established patterns for collaborative learning and uses this to generate new activities based on OER, i.e. to re-purpose existing OER so that they could be used in collaborative learning contexts. This approach has been used as the basis for a series of workshops to communicate and test the ideas.

An output was a very successful workshop "Collaborative patterns and design for OER: new approaches to improve the design and reuse of resources", which took place on 30 June 2009.

Dates visited OU UK

21 April to 12 August 2009

Institution

University of Valladolid, Spain

Biographic information

Yannis A Dimitriadis is currently a Full Professor of Telematics Engineering, at the Telecommunications Engineering School, University of Valladolid, where he is heading a multidisciplinary team (GSIC/EMIC: Group of Intelligent and Cooperative Systems/Education, Media, Information and Culture) on Technology-Enhanced Learning.

The GSIC/EMIC members come from the fields of Telecommunications Engineering, Computer Science, and Pedagogy and they are mainly devoted to research in: the design and development of underlying technologies for e-learning applications (middleware and the semantic annotation of e-learning resources, among others); the role and the needed technological support for educators as designers of customized e-learning applications; the educative evaluation of the effectiveness of e-learning; and the educational advantages and technological requirements of collaborative technology-enhanced learning or Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL).

One of his main activities deals with interaction analysis in CSCL environments, with specific contributions with respect to a mixed evaluation method, the computational model for interactions, a role-based framework, as well as multiple real case studies. He has participated in the e-learning TELL project that studied the effectiveness of CSCL, as well as in several Kaleidoscope projects on interaction analysis, besides the eContentPlus project Share.TEC on federated repositories of resources for Teacher Educators.

Dr. Dimitriadis received the B.S. degree from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1981, the M.S. degree from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 1983, and the Ph. D. degree from the University of Valladolid, Spain, in 1992, all in telecommunications engineering.

Main Output

Evidence was gathered regarding re-purposing of OER for CSCL. The workshop that was carried out in the final part of the stay reinforced the claim about the power of pedagogical patterns as mediating artefacts for learning design.

Outputs

  • Workshop "Collaborative patterns and design for OER: new approaches to improve the design and reuse of resources" which took place on 30 June 2009
  • A co-authored conference paper
  • A co-authored book chapter

References

Admin (2009) ‘Collaborative patterns and design for OER: new approaches to improve the design and reuse of resources’, olnet.org, 29 June [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/35 (Accessed 1 Feb 2012)

Conole, Gráinne; McAndrew, Patrick and Dimitriadis, Yannis (2011). ‘The role of CSCL pedagogical patterns as mediating artefacts for repurposing Open Educational Resources’, In: Pozzi, Francesca and Persico, Donatella eds. ‘Techniques for Fostering Collaboration in Online Learning Communities: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives’. Hershey, USA: IGI Global, 206-233, [online] http://oro.open.ac.uk/23040/ and http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/techniques-fostering-collaboration-online-learning/46914 ($30) (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Conole, G (2009), ‘Presentation: Dimitriadis et al. New design approaches to repurposing OERs for collaborative learning’, cloudworks, 7 December [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/2758 (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Conole, G (2009), ‘Workshop: Collaborative patterns and design for OER’, cloudworks, 30 June [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/1799 (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Dimitriadis, Yannis; McAndrew, Patrick; Conole, Grainne and Makriyannis, Elpida (2009). New design approaches to repurposing open educational resources for collaborative learning using mediating artefacts. In: Ascilite 2009: Same places, different spaces, 6-9 Dec 2009, Auckland, New Zealand. [online] http://www.ascilite.org.au/conferences/auckland09/procs/dimitriadis.pdf  and http://oro.open.ac.uk/19378/ (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Dimitriadis, Y (2011), ‘EEE-Learn3-Sofocles 2011: WS on national TEL R&D projects ‘, cloudworks, 28 October [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2357 (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

McAndrew, P (2009), ‘Yannis Dimitriadis Fellowship’, olnet.org, 2 November [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/118 (Accessed 1 Feb 2012).

Update Since Fellowship

Taking into account that the main personal expertise was on collaborative learning and pedagogical patterns, the stay increased the awareness of the issues and connections to the OER field. Several local activities at Valladolid were carried out with respect to the use of OER and their use in the context of CSCL, while significant work has been done in the framework of the European Share.TEC project.

Links

http://www.gsic.uva.es/wikis/yannis/index.php/OUInitialPage

 

José Luis Fernández Vindel

ll by UNED, on Flickr
Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License  by  UNED 

 

Name

José Luis Fernández Vindel

Project Title

Developing Multilingual media components that are directly embeddable in open educational resources in science and technology

Project Summary

José was funded by his own university to visit the UK and was hosted by the OLnet project, providing practical support for the period of his visit.  He worked closely during his stay with OLnet’s Research Fellow Dr Tina Wilson.

Dates visited OU UK

1st April to 30 June 2011

Institution

Universidad Nacional de Educacin a Distancia (UNED), Spain

Biographic information

José Luis Fernández Vindel has a Bachelor's degree in Physics from the UNED and a Master's degree in Theoretical Physics from the UAM (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain), PhD. in Science (Artificial Intelligence: Artificial Vision) from UNED in 1994. He has been an Associate Professor in the Department of Artificial Intelligence at UNED since 1996.

His current and past teaching responsibilities include undergraduate and graduate courses on the theory of computation and computational logic (knowledge representation and reasoning, modal logic, description logic, ontologies).

In recent years, José has mainly been involved in executive tasks, first as Vice-Dean, Deputy Head of the School of Computer Engineering [2006-09], and later, as Vice-Rector, Pro Vice Chancellor of Technology at UNED [2009-10].

Main Output

Collections of conceptual animations to develop definitions and propositions of technical issues

Outputs

  • CompendiumLD was used to discuss abstract graphical patterns
  • Animations without text or audio that can be embedded in OER for Science and Technology

References

J.L. Fernández-Vindel, and T. Wilson (2011). Multilingual media components directly embeddable in open educational resources in science and technology. International Conference on Education, Research and Innovation - ICERI 2011 14 -16th November 2011, Madrid, Spain. Available from: http://oro.open.ac.uk/30518/1/vindel-wilson-proceedings.pdf

José Luis Fernández Vindel and Tina Wilson (2012). ‘A diagrammatic language to build and share STEM teaching narratives’. STEM Annual Conference, Higher Education Academy, 12 Apr 2012 - 13 Apr 2012, Imperial College London, England, SW7 2AZ

Update Since Fellowship

Since returning to Spain, José has continued to collaborate with Dr Tina Wilson.

 

Sandhya Gunness

OLnet Fellow Sandyha Gunness
 

Name

Sandhya Gunness

Project Title

Appraising the transformative power of OER for student-centred teaching in Developing countries

Project Summary

The focus of Sandhya's OLnet Fellowship was to gather information about Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Educational Practices (OEP) so as to inform stakeholders in developing countries of the potentials of OER to improve and update curricula, develop institutional capacity and manage growing student cohorts with increasingly differentiated and specific learning needs more effectively.

She met with Dr Freda Wolfenden and Dr Frank Banks from the TESSA initiative and Pauline Ngimwa who was a PhD student at the Open University to learn more about Open Educational Resource uses in Sub-Saharan Africa. Inspired by the work of Dr Chris Pegler and Susan D’Antoni, she devised a questionnaire to evaluate OER awareness and use which would be instrumental to devise training and capacity building workshops to address OER resistance issues with the help of Dr Tina Wilson. After discussions with Patrick McAndrew and Martin Weller on the topics of Openness and OER Beyond policies, when it becomes practice, she is now working on the paradoxes and contradictions of OER as more and more HE are being transformed into businesses, and whether the professional identity of the academic should be more related to shaping the learning experience, and what will be the student expectations versus credibility of the institution using OER. Her brief meeting with Paul Mundin introduced her to OPAL and open educational practices, where she hopes to work further to develop Best Practice examples in collaboration with other HEIs in Mauritius and Africa.

She also participated in workshops organised by SCORE to learn more about OER and the Creative Commons licensing and to present her research areas. Sandhya believes that OER is not just about the contents or knowledge that these provide, but more about a change in mindset to be able to dissociate lecturing apart from content to encompass the learners needs, to move from exam-oriented assessments to life-long learning skills, and from competition to collaboration.

Dates visited the UK

13 September to 15 October 2011

Institution

University of Mauritius – Virtual Centre for Innovative Learning Technologies

Biographic information

Sandhya Gunness currently teaches at the University of Mauritius on the BSc and MSc Edtech programmes, namely for the Open Educational Resources, Leadership and Technology management; Social Networking; Principles of learning design. Her interests cover online pedagogical strategies, Open Educational Practices and Learning Design. She has coordinated several international collaborative projects with COL, SADC, COMESA and under the EDU-LINK EU-funded projects.

Main Output

Created more awareness about OER, OEP, Creative Commons and legal frameworks through research seminars and focus groups at the University of Mauritius with the collaboration of other TEI’s. Organised debates around issues of Opening content generated by public funding to the public. Initiated a community of practice with specific activity areas and post details (timetables, content, activities, reports) onto open learning platforms: OpenLearn, VCILT Moodle e-learning platform, WIZIQ, Slideshare , FaceBook, etc.

Update Since Fellowship

A paper was sent to the OCWC Cambridge 2012 conference (16-18 April) to report on findings at the University of Mauritius about OER awareness and reuse and the potential to transform teaching practices to more Learner-centred approached.

An OER awareness seminar on the theme: Openness, Collaboration and Creativity was conducted on the 7th March 2012 at the University of Mauritius with participants from four different Faculties, Centres and the Tertiary Education Commission. The presentations were made by the academics themselves on how different they perceived Open educational resources. It was clear that policies for opening content were acutely missing and that the Tertiary Education Commission (which was a body for regulating Higher Education Institutions) miscomprehended online mode of deliveries. There was a strong need for a mind-shift from the concepts that “Knowledge is Power” to “Knowledge-Sharing is Power”.

  • 08:50 - 09:00    | Registration
  • 09:00 - 09:10     | Welcome
  • 09:10 - 09:30     | Introduction to Open Educational Resources and Openness for HEIs S.Gunness, VCILT
  • 09:30 -09:55     | Open Educational resources for AgriSciences – K.Boodhoo, FoAg
  • 09:55 -10:20     | OERs and their promises for Medical Sciences in developing countries – S.Goorah , FoS
  • 10:20 – 10:35     TEA BREAK
  • 10:35 -11:00    | OERs in Engineering – Opportunities for collaboration –K.Baguant /MD Nowbuth, FEng
  • 11:00 – 11:30    | Knowledge Management and processes for Open Education– I. Vencatachellum, FLM
  • 11:30 – 12:00     | Tools for OER Creative use and reuse. – G.K. Bahadur , VCILT
     

World Education Summit 13-15 July 2011, New Dehli, India - Higher Education Track/Sandhya Gunness on YouTube

Helen Jelfs

OLnet Fellow Helen Jelfs

CC-BY Simon Buckingham Shum

Name

Helen Jelfs

Project Title

Mapping Deeper Learning

Project Summary

The focus of Helen's OLnet Fellowship was on developing and extending the evidence hub emerging from current OLnet research around the impact of Open Educational Resources, and to respond to the Hewlett Foundation’s new priority on Deeper Learning. “Deeper Learning” covers the theory, methods, practice and impact of education which takes seriously the dispositions and skills of learning to learn and enquiry-based learning, two of the most fundamental concepts for learner engagement which sit at the heart of the 21st Century challenges which many now recognize as pivotal to the future mission of education: preparing “K-Life” learners (i.e. from early school days, to the current workforce, and beyond) to cope with dilemmas and levels of complexity that will make unprecedented demands on them intellectually, emotionally, and socially.

She worked with Simon Buckingham-Shum and Anna de Liddo, aiming to use and evaluate Cohere as a tool for enhancing the literature review process and its potential for collaborative learning around issues of shared significance with interested partners.

The premise is that by annotating and mapping deeper learning literature it will make OLnet even more relevant to the needs of the OER community in general, and to the Hewlett Foundation in particular, especially given they will need a quality research site to direct people to around this new thematic priority.

Dates visited OU UK

Fellowship period from April – July, and visited OU on 12th and 13th July 2011

Institution

University of Bristol, UK

Biographic information

Helen is a research Associate at the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol.

Her current research focuses on the design and implementation of innovative pedagogies such as authentic enquiry, the theory and practice of ‘deeper learning’ and the relationship of learning to learn and the spiritual development of young people.

Recent research has included (1) ‘Learning Futures’, a project evaluating the impact of innovative pedagogies aimed at increasing student engagement in leading-edge schools, and (2) the ‘Spirituality, Learning and Personalisation’ project exploring the relationship between learning to learn and the spiritual development of young people.

After gaining her PhD, which focussed on the role of Church schools today, Helen Jelfs was a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at Liverpool Hope University where she taught on undergraduate courses in Initial Teacher Education and Education Studies. She has previously worked on the development of Learning Power, an assessment tool for building learning power dispositions in classrooms and was a fieldworker on the National Evaluation of Sure Start. She has also been a visiting lecturer in the Faculty of Education at the University of the West of England. She was formerly a primary school teacher.

Main Output

A literature review of Deeper Learning using the web-based annotation and discussion tool Cohere.

Outputs

The key themes to emerge included: learner autonomy – highlighting the sub-themes of managing self and self-directed learning, making thinking and learning explicit and skills for a complex life; learning how to learn - highlighting the sub-themes of learning power, social and cooperative learning and meaningful learning; and a commonly held learning language highlighting the sub-themes of teachers’ beliefs about learning, authentic intellectual work and authentic pedagogy.

These ideas form the basis for ongoing collaborative work with partner organisations in the field of ‘Next practice’ or ‘deeper learning’ pedagogy.

References

Buckingham Shum, S (2011), 'Mapping the Deeper Learning Literature using Cohere', olnet.org, 19 July [online], http://olnet.org/node/610 (Accessed 24 January 2012)

Dr Helen Jelfs using Cohere for mapping literature about Deeper Learning (2011), YouTube video, Added by OLnet [online],  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxI5jPGScoU (Accessed 26 April 2012) - Embedded below.

IET Tech Coffee Morning - Mapping the Deeper Learning Literature using Cohere (2011), cloudworks, 13 July [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2326 (Accessed 24 January 2012)

Update Since Fellowship

On 12th November 2011, I introduced my OLnet Fellowship work to students on the MSc Systems Learning and Leadership programme in the GSoE, Univ of Bristol: a Cohere group around Systems Learning and Leadership has also been created.  On 24th November 2011, I also participated in a seminar as part of the Systems Learning and Leadership Seminar Series.

Jia Yimin

OLnet Fellow Jia Yimin and Guangyu Freear

CC-BY Patrick McAndrew. Pictured: Jia Yimin (left) and Guangyu Frear (right) who worked alongside Yimin and Elpida Makryannis facilitating communication and translating useful documents about OER in China from Chinese to English.

Name

Yimin Jia

Project Title

Collaborative Learning in China using Open Educational Resources

Project Summary

Yimin's fellowship research focused on "How can an online platform support collaborative learning using Open Educational Resources?" and involved:

  • a literature review of international OER, online platforms, communities and tools
  • creating a social support environment for a specific course;
  • integrating existing OU materials with some external material from Chinese OER sources;
  • publishing one or more papers as a result of this research project

She worked with Elpida Makriyannis, aiming to share research findings and exchange research experiences with a focus around user behaviour and participattory learning in UK, Chinese and international online learning communities and platforms.

Dates visited OU UK

13th September to 12th November 2010

Institution

Future Education Research Centre, South China Normal University (SCNU)

Biographic information

Yimin is a Lecturer of Educational Technology in the Department of Educational Technology, School of Information Technology in Education of the South China Normal University (SCNU). Together with Prof. Sang Xinmin and Prof. Jiao Jianli, she formed the main teaching team at the Future Education Research Centre of the South China Normal University (SCNU) and developed one of the award-winning national-level teaching courses by the Chinese Ministry of Education for the National Courses of Excellence program, on the subject of learning theory. She leads a team of 15 universities and colleges from different Chinese provinces where undergraduate students use online platforms and tools to collaborate and learn from their teachers and their peers using openly and freely available  teaching materials. She holds a Masters in Educational Technology from the South China Normal University. She is married and has a young daughter.

Main Output

During my OLnet fellowship research, I investigated the possibilities of supporting collaborative and participatory learning using open educational resources and learning materials through an online platform. There are three key findings from my fellowship research, these are:

a. Motivation, context and personal preferences in online learning can greatly influence the learning experience and the participatory behaviour of the learner.

b. Online learning activities are constrained and dependent on specific curriculum structures which affect student behaviour and learning experience in online communities and networks.

c. OER use and re-use by students in China. The main challenge for my students in China with regards to open educational resources and online learning environments, is language. Due to the fact most resources are in English and most successful international online learning environments are also mainly in English, it has been difficult to use and re-use OER which haven't been translated into Chinese.

Outputs

  • Presentation at the Open Educational Resources 2011 Conference “The National Courses of Excellence Program: OER for Higher Education in China” together with Dr Elpida Makriyannis
  • Journal paper with Dr Elpida Makriyannis for Tsinghua University Press journal Modern Educational Technology with the title “Fairy Rings of Participation in Online Communities: Lessons for Chinese Online Education” (in chinese)
  • Blog post about Open Educational Resources in China
  • Translation of Chinese surveys and reports in English (by Gunagyu Freear) to be shared with the OLnet research team and also through presentations and papers for the international OER community.
  • Translation of English documents and reports in Chinese, in order to progress my research and help in the dissemination of international best practice in OER and online learning to the Chinese academic community and universities.
  • Presentation of research findings on the National Courses of Excellence in China, to the OLnet team

References

贾义敏, Elpida Makriyannis (2011), 在线社区中的“仙女环”参与模型研究, 现代教育技术, 第21卷 ,2011年第11期  {Jia, Y., Makriyannis, E. (2011) “Fairy Rings of Participation in Online Communities: Lessons for Chinese Online Education”, Modern Educational Technology, Tsinghua University Press, Vol, 21, No. 11 2011, Beijing, China.

Jia, Y (2010), ' Initial information about Open Educational Resources in China', olnet.org, 28 September [online], http://olnet.org/node/485 (Accessed 24/01/12)

Santos, AI (2010), 'The development of OER in China', Open Content Online, 10 November [online], http://aisantos.wordpress.com/2010/11/10/the-development-of-oer-in-china/ (Accessed 24/01/12)

Update Since Fellowship

During the second month of my fellowship I introduced (via skype and QQ) Dr Elpida Makriyannis to my research group of colleagues, teachers and students at the Future of Education Centre. Elpida introduced her Fairy Rings of participation model and a vibrant discussion started about ways to use this model for online learning communities in China. Many questions were raised from both my teaching team and my students that day and so we decided to continue working together with Elpida even after my fellowship had ended. As a consequence, we have now published a journal paper identifying key lessons that the Chinese online learning communities can learn from the Fairy Rings model of participation and understanding how to apply the model in order to improvement participation and collaborative learning. Upon my return to the university, I was able to share with my colleagues, line manager and students everything I learnt at the Institute of Education and at the Open University, including findings about the Open Learn platform, Compendium as a teaching tool, models and methodologies used in the UK and internationally, and more importantly the ethos of sharing experiences and know-how, but also achieving a better understanding of what it means to learn and teach in a more open world. My OLnet fellowship has been a very good and helpful experience for me.

Svetlana Knyazeva

OLnet Fellow Svetlana Knyazeva
Picture provided by Fellow

Name

Svetlana Knyazeva

Project Title

OER: Quality Assurance, Effectiveness of Using and Legacy

Project Summary

The main objective of Svetlana’s OLnet Fellowship research was the facilitation of early stages of OER movement in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and ensuring sustainability of a project launched by the Moscow-based UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education (UNESCO IITE).

The UNESCO IITE project is aimed at promoting Russian-language open educational resources and includes exploring policy options, identifying needs and opportunities, as well as capacity-building in the production and use of OER in CIS countries. Eventually the UNESCO IITE project shall result in a wider access of the Russian-speaking education community to Russian-language resources.

The research was focused on the examination of three major problems concerned with the production and use of OER:

  • the quality of open educational resources;
  • the effectiveness of use of OER; and  
  • copyright and open content licensing, as applied to the copyright laws existing in Russia/CIS.

This research and the contacts made with Open University researchers has contributed to the UNESCO IITE activities in the development of recommendations and normative guidelines for OER in CIS.

Dates visited OU UK

Two visits. 1 June to 22 June 2010 and 7-11 February 2011.

Institution

UNESCO IITE, Moscow, Russia

Biographic information

Svetlana Knyazeva holds PhD in Information and Library Science and is an Advisor for Communication and Information at the UNESCO Moscow Office. Since 2009 she has been coordinating a project on Open Educational Resources in non-English-speaking countries implemented jointly by the UNESCO Moscow Office and the UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education. Before she joined UNESCO she was employed by the Centre for International Cooperation in Education Development as an expert and the State University – Higher School of Economics as Director of the Centre for International Mobility of Researchers. Most of her previous appointments were with the Russian Academy of Sciences as a researcher and coordinator of international R&D cooperation.

Main Output

During the four weeks of my stay at Milton Keynes I learned a lot about the University and its efforts in promoting OER initiatives within and beyond the UK (OpenLearn, LabSpace, OPAL, MORIL, TESSA, etc.). What impressed me the most is the professionalism and dedication of OU staff to the idea of open education and open educational content. I would like to thank Patrick McAndrew, Grainne Conole, Andy Lane, Freda Wolfenden, Teresa Connolly, Andrea Inamorato dos Santos, Giota Alevizou, Paul Mundin, Dominique Newbould, Karen Cropper, Martin Weller, Tina Wilson, Rebecca Galley and many other staff members of the multinational OLnet team.

Outputs

  • Invitation for Patrick McAndrew and Karen Cropper to present at the UNESCO IITE International Conference in St Petersburg November 2010
  • Commissioned UNESCO IITE Policy Briefings x 3
  • Commissioned report on OER in Brazil
  • The final draft of a paper "Introducing OER opportunities and challenges: the case of the Commonwealth of Independent States and Baltic States" in co-authorship with Andy Lane for UNESCO/CoL monograph submitted by December 2011

References

Lane, A (2010), ‘Global trends in the development and use of open educational resources to reform educational practices’, UNESCO IITE Policy Brief, November [online], http://iite.unesco.org/files/policy_briefs/pdf/en/global_trends.pdf (Accessed 1 Feb 2012)

McAndrew, P (2010), ‘Fostering Open Educational Practices - Presentation in St Petersburg at UNESCO IITE International Conference’, olnet.org, 9 December [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/536 (Accessed 1 Feb 2012)

McAndrew, P and Cropper, K (2011), ‘Open educational resources and intellectual property rights’, UNESCO IITE Policy Brief, January [online], http://iite.unesco.org/files/policy_briefs/pdf/en/oer_and_ipr.pdf (Accessed 1 Feb 2012)

McAndrew, P (2011) ‘ICTs and Teacher Competencies’ Patrick McAndrew, UNESCO IITE Policy Brief, October [online], http://iite.unesco.org/files/policy_briefs/pdf/en/icts_and_teacher.pdf (Accessed 1 Feb 2012)

Santos, AI (2011) ‘Open Educational Resources in Brazil: State-of-the-Art, Challenges and Prospects for Development and Innovation, UNESCO IITE Publication, [online], ISBN 978-5-905175-06-0, http://iite.unesco.org/pics/publications/en/files/3214695.pdf (Accessed 1 Feb 2012)

Update Since Fellowship

"I continue working on UNESCO/IITE OER project - the information I received during the fellowship at OU UK improved my knowledge about OER, the relationships established with the members of the network support my professional activities and I hope to continue to work together on joint research project and to promote OER in non-English-speaking countries."

Kasia Kozinska

Olnet Student Kasia Kozinska

Name

Kasia Kozinska

Thesis Title

'Supporting lifelong learning: motivations for and processes of learning with different Open Educational Resources' (CASE Studentship funded from Fellowship budget)

Dates

1 October 2009 to September 2012

Papers

Kozinska, K.; Kursun, E.; Wilson, T.; McAndrew, P.; Scanlon, E. and Jones, A. (2010). Are open educational resources the future of e-learning? In: 3rd International Future-Learning Conference: Innovations in Learning for the Future, 10-14 May 2010, Istanbul, Turkey. Available from: http://oro.open.ac.uk/21123/

Kozinska, K., McAndrew, P.; Jones, A., Scanlon, E. (2011). Motivations for socio-collaborative learning practices: examining how community and interactions support learning among registered users on OpenLearn, Proceedings of the 6th Open Knowledge Conference, 2011, Hellmann, S., Frischmuth, P., Auer, S., Dietrich, D. (Eds.), June 30 & July 1, Berlin, Germany. Available from: http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-739/paper_4.pdf

Presentations

Social Learning in the context of OpenLearn (The Open University Systems and Communications Department Social Learning Seminar 2010), academic supervision: Dr Ann Jones, Dr Patrick McAndrew, Prof Eileen Scanlon, Dr Tina Wilson.  Available from: http://www.slideshare.net/KasiaKAka/social-learning-in-the-context-of-openlearn

Global Tendencies in Open Educational Resources (OER); Different approaches to OER: benefits, trends and challenges from the learner, educator and provider perspectives (UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education International OER Workshop, 2011), Academic supervision: Dr Patrick McAndrew, Dr Ann Jones, Prof Eileen Scanlon.  Available from: http://www.slideshare.net/KasiaKAka/kozinska-oe-rpres112-3

Blog posts

Kozinska, K (2011),"OLnet TESSA visiting Fellows from Mauritius (24 January - 4 February 2011): Anuradha (Anu) Gungadeen and Pritee Auckloo", olnet.org, 3 February [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/555 (Accessed 21 February 2012)

Kozinska, K (2011), 'International Workshop ‘Open Educational Resources and Intellectual Property Rights’, May 31 – June 1 2011, Moscow, Russia', olnet.org, 3 June [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/592 (Accessed 15 March 2012)

Kozinska, K (2011), "Juliana Bbuye: OLnet, TESSA, and the educators of tomorrow", olnet.org, 7 July [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/615 (Accessed 21 February 2012)

Kozinska, K (2011), "Marcelo Maina: best design for learning", olnet.org, 21 July [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/613 (Accessed 23 February 2012)

Kozinska, K (2011), 'Murilo Mendonca: OLnet fellowship observations, reflections, goals, impressions', olnet.org, 21 July [online], http://olnet.org/node/614 (Accessed 13 December 2011)

Kozinska, K (2011), 'Susan D’Antoni: Open Educational Resources (OER) as a universal responsibility’, olnet.org, 21 July [online], http://olnet.org/node/612  (Accessed 13 December 2011).

Kozinska, K (2011), 'Murilo Mendonca part II: more on collaboration with the OU, UK; OpenLearn use by UNISU VIRTUAL', olnet.org, 17 August [online], http://olnet.org/node/619 (Accessed 13 December 2011)

All Kasia's blog posts on olnet.org

Engin Kursun

Engin Kursun OLnet Fellow

Name

Engin Kursun

Project Title

Study of OER in Turkey

Project Summary

Engin visited the Open University as part of his study for a PhD. His research aims to inform decision-makers by developing a policy framework about OER in Turkey. He used multi-method research design to develop the policy framework. His PhD. study consisted of two parts. The first part focuses on incentives, barriers and benefits of OER in perspectives of faculty members. He used the survey method for this part. The second part takes three OER initiatives in Turkey into focus and aimed to understand the challenges those initiatives have encountered and strategies they applied to overcome those challenges. Multicase study approach was used in this phase by interviewing with practitioners in these three OER initiatives, observing the initiatives portals and examining internal documents, reports etc. of those initiatives.

Dates visited OU UK

3 August 2009 to 20 January 2010, with return visit to present at OER10 (22-24 March 2010) at Cambridge University, UK.

Institution

Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Biographic information

Engin Kursun is a PhD Student and Research Assistant at the Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology at Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey on behalf of Atatürk Üniversity. The PhD program that he pursues is an integrated PhD program, which requires completing 52 credit courses and a PhD thesis after a bachelor degree. He also did his undergraduate degree at the same department with a first honour degree at Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey. Engin’s main areas of interest are Open Educational Resources, OpenCourseWare movement,  game-based learning, human computer interaction and multimedia design.

Engin has a strong link to the Turkish Open Courseware (OCW) Consortium, through his PhD supervisor in Turkey. The Turkish OCW consortium site was administered by Engin using Drupal. The Consortium had 57 member universities and many interesting initiatives at the end of Engin's visit to the UK (January 2010).

Main Output

Engin said that his OLnet experience was very positive in being immersed in an academic context, discussing his thesis with OER experts.  Personally, his language development and the cultural exchange were very useful, as were the doctoral training workshops that he was able to attend and the Open University DigiLab and Library resources available to him. He added "The project was a fantastic opportunity for me because I had a chance to meet a number of experts in my PhD field, which would not have been possible otherwise. The project supported me not only financial, but also I had chance to get feedback from OER experts for my work."

He had a chance to investigate OpenLearn project closely in the context of OLnet project by interviewing with Andy Lane, Rose Webb and Patrick McAndrew about OpenLearn, examining its internal reports and web portals. This widened his perspectives while developing policy framework in his thesis and affected his decisions on these policies. Also he has a chance to get information about other projects on OER at OU (Pocket Project, SCORE) from first hand (Tina Wilson, Chris Pegler) and tools developed in the context of OLnet project like Compendium and Cohere (Anna de Liddo). OLnet project meetings were helpful for him especially to get info about updates in OER field like conferences, projects and tools. He also find a chance to learn different projects like iSpot (Doug Clow) and Fairy rings (Elpida Makryannis).

Outputs

  • 3 conference papers
  • Presentation to OLnet Team 13 January 2010
  • Exchange of information about OER adoption in Turkey

References

Kozinska, K.; Kursun, E.; Wilson, T.; McAndrew, P.; Scanlon, E. and Jones, A. (2010). Are open educational resources the future of e-learning? In: 3rd International Future-Learning Conference: Innovations in Learning for the Future, 10-14 May 2010, Istanbul, Turkey. Available online: http://oro.open.ac.uk/21123/

Kursun, Engin; Wilson, Tina; McAndrew, Patrick and Cagiltay, Kursat (2010). Evaluating the current status of OpenCourseWare in Turkish Tertiary Education: Benefits, barriers and incentives. In: Open Educational Resources 2010 (OER10), 22-24 March 2010, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Available online: http://oro.open.ac.uk/21120/

Kursun, Engin; Wilson, Tina; McAndrew, Patrick and Cagiltay, Kursat (2010). Evaluating three different Open Educational Resource models provided to enable Learning in Our Connected World. In: Association for Educational Communications and Technology, 2010 AECT convention, 26-30 October 2010., Anaheim, California, USA. Available online: http://oro.open.ac.uk/29815/

Clow, D (2010), ‘OLnet full team meeting 13 January 2010’, olnet.org, 13 January [online], http://olnet.org/node/195 (Accessed 1 December 2011)

Update Since Fellowship

Engin says, "Since I finished my OLnet Fellowship I have written my PhD thesis. The project helped my thesis work a lot in terms of critical analysis of the OER projects in my country."

He and his PhD advisor wrote a report to UNESCO titled as Open Educational Resources in Turkey: State-of-the-Art, Challenges and Prospects for Development with the help of network in the OLnet project (Svetlana Knyazeva).

Scott Leslie

Name

Scott Leslie

Project Title

Tracking OER Reuse of “Download-able” Resources

Project Summary

The OLnet project posed, as part of a larger set of Research Questions, some specific questions about how to track the Reuse of OER:

5a. Are OER being reused by teachers – track from demand side but could try sampling teaching to see if there is any evidence of OER in the teaching materials that students see.

5b. Automated ways to track OER such as watermarks. Persistence and comparison of original with derived.

During his visit as an OLnet Expert Fellow, Scott Leslie devised a method to track OER that have been downloaded from their original locations and are being used elsewhere, a use case that did not appear to have been previously addressed by the OER community.

Dates visited OU UK

24 June – 23 July 2010

Institution

BCCampus, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Biographic information

Scott Leslie is an educational technologist, hacker, researcher and open content/open network activist. He currently works as the Manager of Client Services in Open Education for BCcampus, a province-wide post-secondary agency in British Columbia, Canada.

Previously, Scott researched course management systems, repository and eportfolio software with Dr. Bruce Landon as part of the Western Cooperative on Educational Telecommunications’ (WCET) Edutools.info team. He was the research coordinator for educational technology at the Centre for Curriculum, Transfer and Technology (C2T2), a post-secondary system agency in British Columbia, Canada.

Scott was also the webmaster at both Mount Royal College and The Banff Centre for Continuing Education, and an instructor for the PanCanadian EdTech Summer Institute. He holds a combined honors BA in English and Philosophy from the University of Western Ontario, and a MA in Critical and Cultural Theory from the University of Wales, College Cardiff.

Main Output

“My time as an OLnet fellow gave me a chance to work out ways to track OER materials after they have been downloaded from our repository and reused in other contexts. This was invaluable both for the time to create a working prototype but also to work through some of the policy issues the approach raised.”

Outputs

  • Prototype method for tracking reuse of OER
  • Presentation to OLnet Team July 2010 Video online
  • Presentation to OU staff July 2010 Video online
  • Draft Paper (wiki)

References

Leslie, S (2010), ‘Tracking Downloadable OER Content’ (DRAFT), edtechpost, [online] http://edtechpost.wikispaces.com/OLNet+-+Draft+Paper (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Leslie, S (2010), ‘OLNet Fellowship Week 2 – Initial Thoughts on Tracking Downloaded OERs’, edtechpost, 12 July [online], http://www.edtechpost.ca/wordpress/2010/07/12/olnet-tracking-oer-first-stab/ (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Leslie, S (2010), ‘OLNet Tracking Resources’, edtechpost, [online], http://edtechpost.wikispaces.com/OLNet+Tracking+Resourceshttp://edtechpost.wikispaces.com/OLNet+Tracking+Resources (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Leslie, S (2010), ‘OLNet Fellowship Research - Tracking Usage of Downloaded OER’, cloudworks, 19 July [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2150 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Leslie, S (2010), ‘Tracking Downloaded OER’, video of presentation to OLnet team, July [online], http://podcast.open.ac.uk/oulearn/education/educational-technology-and-practice/podcast-OLnet_Fellows#!b064e77b59 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Leslie, S (2010), ‘The Open Educator as DJ’, video of presentation given to Open University Staff, July [online], http://podcast.open.ac.uk/oulearn/education/educational-technology-and-practice/podcast-OLnet_Fellows#!914f683921 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Leslie, S (2009), ‘The Open Educator as DJ - Towards an Actual Practice of Educational Remix’,  edtechpost, 11 June [online], http://edtechpost.wikispaces.com/Open+Educator+as+DJ+(Final) (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Update Since Fellowship

“I did come back with the intention of implementing the prototype into production, but a variety of reasons, both technical and policy, have prevented that. The fellowship did provide the basis though for more realistic decision making around tracking data and what was important to us.”

“I am very happy to continue relating to folks in OLnet. One happy by-product of my time there was a chapter co-authored with Alexandra Okada of the KMI. This was based on a talk I did while at the OU, and so while not part of my initial fellowship proposal, a very happy result in any case, and hopefully additional collaborations will result too.”

Sheila MacNeill

Sheila MacNeil OLnet Fellow

Name

Sheila MacNeill

Project Title

Representing OLnet at OCWC Global 2009 Conference

Project Summary

The themes of the conference were Content, Infrastructure, and Creativity.

“Creativity is often viewed as freedom of the imagination from the restraints imposed by economic necessity, convention, law or any number of other factors. Yet creativity also requires provision for the material and means of production. Establishing a solid foundation for informed creativity is one of the primary goals of the open education movement.

How do we, as educators, designers and developers, present content so as to unleash, inspire and enable creativity on a variety of levels? How do we measure and build upon our successes, the most satisfying of which may be a long time coming to fruition?

Meanwhile, infrastructure has traditionally been seen as the set of lower-level services and physical architectures which make the delivery of higher level services possible - pipes, roads, power grids, and server farms. It's been suggested that open content itself, and not just its attendant delivery systems, can be seen as infrastructure. It has also been suggested that the role of the OCWC is to provide infrastructure for its members.

What are the consequences of seeing open content as infrastructure? Are there historical precedents are there? How could a concept of "content as infrastructure" inform what we do - or, for that matter, lead us astray? How does this view affect our attitudes toward what flows through the pipe, over the wire, or on the road?” (Caulfield 2008)

Participants were invited to consider the ways in which these issues inform the way they participate in OpenCourseWare and the larger Open Access Movement.

Dates

Fellowship funding was for a visit to Monterrey, Mexico 21-24 April 2009

Institution

University of Strathclyde, UK

Biographic information

Sheila MacNeill is one of the Assistant Directors at CETIS, based at the University of Strathclyde. Her main areas of interest and work are around the user experience of using and implementing technology for teaching and learning. Currently much of her work surrounds supporting the curriculum design and delivery programmes, the widget working group and the semantic technologies working group.

Main Output

Reporting back about the conference in clouds on cloudworks and Shiela’s blog and participating and networking at the conference.

Outputs

  • Clouds within the conference cloudscape on cloudworks.
  • Blog post on CETIS work blog.

References

Bays, T (2009), ‘OCWC Global 2009’, cloudworks, 17 April [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/1467 (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Caulfield, M (2008) ‘A Call for Papers: OCWC Global 2009 - Content, Infrastructure, and Creativity’, OCW Consortium Wiki, 17 December [online], http://wiki.ocwconsortium.org/index.php?title=A_Call_for_Papers:_OCWC_Global_2009_-_Content%2C_Infrastructure%2C_and_Creativity (Accessed 2 Feb 2012) Licensed CC-BY-SA

MacNeill, S (2009), ‘OCWC Global 2009’, Sheila’s work blog, 1 May [online], http://blogs.cetis.ac.uk/sheilamacneill/2009/05/01/ocwc-global-2009/ (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

MacNeill, S (2009), ‘OER Road Trip’, Sheila’s work blog, 24 July [online], http://blogs.cetis.ac.uk/sheilamacneill/2009/07/24/oer-road-trip/ (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Other Links

Shiela’s blog: http://blogs.cetis.ac.uk/sheilamacneill/
 

Marcelo Fabián Maina

Name

Marcelo Fabián Maina

Project Title

Designing OER for versioning

Project Summary

This was a short visit fellowship with the aim of exchange with the OLnet people about the development of an OER design model for versioning.

The approach highlights the importance of thinking OER design in action, immersed in a learning situation. The conceptual and procedural model assists the teacher in the parallel creation of the OER and the definition of learning activities that will use the OER as a primary resource. The activities in turn contribute to reshape the in-progress authoring of the educational piece.

The OER development cycle is complemented with the learners’ productions. Learners’ activity outputs are, in this context, interpreted as learner generated content, which is integrated within the OER. The final state of the OER is an augmented and revised version of the original material.

The specific objectives of the visit were to:

  • Outline a model for the design of OER that meets some of the following criteria:
  1. authored by SME (subject matter experts)
  2. embed pedagogy guiding OER use
  3. allows different types of “augmenting” by students (from open to open)
  • Outline some “rules of thumb” that guide the OER design model application
  • List a set of technical requirements for OER implementation
  • Explore possible ways to collaborate between UOC and OU

Dates visited OU UK

6 to 18 June 2011

Institution

Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)

Biographic information

Marcelo Fabián Maina is a lecturer in Technology Enhanced Learning at the eLearn Center, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC).

As a teacher, he coordinates courses of the Master in Education and ICT (e-learning) and lectures in courses of the Joint Certificate Online Course Design and Teaching (UOC-University of New Mexico).
He obtained a BA in Communications and Education from the Universidad Nacional de Entre Ríos (Argentina), a Master in Communication Sciences from the Université de Montreal, and his PhD in the Information and Knowledge Society Programme at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Barcelona. 

His dissertation is on learning design, with a special focus on design practice exchange (thesis on open repository:  http://www.tesisenred.net/handle/10803/9130/ short version in book chapter: http://alturl.com/2q772). His research encompasses such topics as learning design methods and tools, formalization of different pedagogy approaches, personalized learning, open educational resources and practices, and learning ecologies. He is currently member of the Edul@ab research Group where he develops his research interests. He has also coordinated research and innovation projects as well as lead European project work packages. He has co-authored peer-reviewed publications in scholarly journals and conference proceedings (http://edulab.uoc.edu/en/?page_id=11). He has participated in conference scientific committees, as well as a reviewer in teaching innovation symposiums.

As an OER enthusiastic, he has participated and participates in European projects related to OER and OEP of the Life Long Learning programme “CONCEDE” and “OERTest”, and of the AlfaIII programme “OportUnidad”. He has contributed to the OER repository at UOC “O2” and to the UOC Open CourseWare initiative. He has promoted the approach through webinars and interviews.

Main Output

“There’s a human and an academic side to fellowship. I could fulfil both, gaining a group of colleagues willing to participate in common activities and being able to advance in my project focusing on OER design for learners’ versioning. I was able to discuss and write on this subject purpose of my visit.”

Outputs

  • Paper presented at the Guide2011 conference. Rome, 17-18 November 2011.
  • Paper presented at the TIES2012 conference. Barcelona, 1-3 February. http://ties2012.eu/es/
  • Paper submitted to the CIDUI conference. Barcelona, 4-6 July 2012

References

Maina, M.; Guardia, L. (2012), “Un modelo de creación de contenidos en abiertos para el aprendizaje” [translation “A model of open content creation for learning”], TIES2012 conference. Barcelona, 1-3 February 2012. http://ties2012.eu/es/

Maina, M. (2012). Developing a Method for the Design of Sharable Pedagogical Scenarios. In N. Alias, & S. Hashim (Eds.), Instructional Technology Research, Design and Development: Lessons from the Field (pp. 86-101). doi:10.4018/978-1-61350-198-6.ch006

Kozinska, K (2011), "Marcelo Maina: best design for learning", olnet.org, 21 July [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/613 (Accessed 23 February 2012)

Maina, M. & Guàrdia, L. (2011). Maturing a model of authoring OER for versioning. 5th GUIDE International Conference. Rome (Italy), 18-19 November.

Perez-Mateo, M., Maina, M., Romero, M., & Guitert, M. (2011). Learner generated content: Quality from the student’s point of view. Proceedings of EDMEDIA 2011 (pp.2520-2529), Lisbon, Portugal: AACE.

Pérez-Mateo, M., Maina, M., Guitert, M., & Romero, M. (2011). Learner Generated Content: Quality Criteria in online Collaborative Learning. EURODL, special issue on Creativity and Open Educational Resources (OER). URL: http://alturl.com/tfq9w

Maina, M. (2009). Designing ready to deliver Units of Learning: A case study. Journal of Learning Design, 3(1), 21-33. URL: http://www.jld.qut.edu.au/

Update Since Fellowship

“First, I’ve continued writing on the subject and presenting to the conferences referenced before.
Second, I’ve been working on the development of wiki templates and wiki extension functionalities for the implementation of the project. Finally, I’ve been co-authoring an OER for versioning and outlining an evaluation and validation process of the initiative.

“I just want to mention the value of these fellowships in creating links that go beyond the period they fund. Both in formal and informal ways, gains are assured. Thanks to all.”

Murilo Matos Mendonça

Name

Murilo Matos Mendonça

Project Title

Analysis of the collaborative experience of UnisulVirtual and The Open University

Project Summary

This research project set out to analyse the collaborative experience of UnisulVirtual and The Open University, involving two interconnected projects run by the Open University, namely OpenLearn and OLnet. The aim was to look into the process of mentoring, implementation and cultural adaptation of OER which has been underway and going through different stages at UnisulVirtual ever since a formal collaboration was established in March 2008.

Dates visited OU UK

14 Feb to 13 May 2011

Institution

UnisulVirtual, Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina, Brazil

Biographic information

Murilo Matos Mendonça works for Unisul (University of Southern Santa Catarina), a university that delivers both distance and face-to-face education. In 2010 he left face to face education and concentrated only in distance education for UnisulVirtual.  In this organisation he has three different functions: a teacher of English as a second language, their Open Educational Resources (OER) co-ordinator, and their International Relations Manager. The Fellowship was his first experience of living for an extended period in an English-speaking country, despite the fact that he’s been a teacher of English as a foreign language for more than twenty years and has excellent English.

Murilo was elected as an Institutional Board Member of MIT´s OCWC (OpenCourseWare Consortium), USA. (http://www.ocwconsortium.org) during the OCWC Global 2011 Conference, 4-6 May, 2011, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Main Output

The OLnet Fellowship allowed me to have a deeper understanding of OER by showing me in practice what it is to be open to people, places, methods and ideas.

Together with Prof. Patrick McAndrew and Andreia Inamorato dos Santos and with their help, I wrote an article titled: "Freeing up access to learning: the role for open educational resources", just published.

Outputs

  • Co-authoring of the article titled “Freeing up Access to Learning: the Role of Open Educational Resources” for the GUIDE (Global Universities in Distance Education) publication on Distance Education quality and guidelines launched during the GUIDE International Conference 2011, 18 – 19 November 2011, Rome, Italy.
  • Oral presentation at OER11 titled “Towards Crossing over the Digital Divide: the use of OER to promote digital literacy”. 11 - 13 May 2001, Manchester, UK (abstract at: http://www.ucel.ac.uk/oer11/programme_day1.html)

Activities during visit

  • SCORE (Support Centre for Open Resources in Education) Short-Term Fellowship Residential Course (24 February 2011) – Lectures: 1. “Reflection on the UK OER Programme”, by David Kernohan; 2. “Online Learning Task-Force Report: What does it mean for OER and inter-institution collaboration?”, by Johnathan Darby. 
  • SCORE (Support Centre for Open Resources in Education) Conference “Does it Make a Difference? The impact of repositories and OER on teaching and learning” (23 March 2011): 1. Plenary Session – “Open Oxford – assessing impact beyond the institution”, by David White and Melissa Highton, University of Oxford; Lectures – 2. “OER use: whom what, where, how and most of all WHY?, by Chris Pegler, IET and ORIOLE (Open Resources: Impact on Learners and Educators); 3. The Humbox: a new concept of openness in OER UK”, by Antonio Martinez-Arboleda, Senior Teaching Fellow in Spanish, University of Leeds; 4. The TOETOE Project”, by Alannah Fitzgerald, English Language Centre, University of Durham and SCORE Fellow; 5. “The Impact on Learning of iTunes U Open Educational Resources”, by Terese Bird, SCORE Fellow and Learning Technologist, University of Leicester; 6. LORO and OER repository for language teachers: Does it make a difference?”, by Anna Comas-Quinn, Lecturer in Spanish and SCORE Fellow, The Open University; Plenary Session – 7. “Understanding the role of OER in open educational practices”, by Helen Beetham, JISC Consultant. 
  • Annual Fair “Learn About” of the Institute of Educational Technology – IET, at the Open University UK (30 March 2011): worked at the OER stand, giving information on the OLnet Project and the OER collaboration between UnisulVirtual and the Open University.
  • eSTEeM Brazil Breakfast (30 March 2011): discussão do projeto round of discussions promoted by the eSTEeM Project with Brazilians at the OU in order to identify potential international partnership opportunities to offer post-graduate programmes in Brazil in the STEM area (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).
  • Invited by Tallinn University of Technology to give a presentation on OER during Estonia e-Learning Conference. The presentation was titled Challenges and Idiosyncrasies of e-Learning in Brazil: the case of UnisulVirtual (which included the UnisulVirtual-OU collaboration in OER) 6 – 8 April 2011, Tartu, Estonia.
  • SCORE (Support Centre for Open Resources in Education) Short-Term Fellowship Residential Course (10 – 15 April 2011): Crash course held by the BBC team at the OU – 1. “Principles of Multiplatform Broadcasting”; 2. “Scripting and Storyboarding”; 3. “Interviewing Techniques”.
  • eSTEeM International Colloquium: International Perspectives on the Development of Distance Learning (18 – 21 April 2011): 1. Visit to an Open University Regional Centre in London; 2. Workshop “Quality Assurance in Distance Education”, by Dr. Keith Williams, eSTEeM Director, The Open University; 3. Workshop “Assessment in Distance Learning”, by Prof Peter Taylor, Faculty of Science, The Open University; 4. Lecture “Open Educational Resources”, by Prof Andy Lane, Faculty of Maths, Computing and Technology, The Open University.

References

Kozinska, K (2011), 'Murilo Mendonca: OLnet fellowship observations, reflections, goals, impressions', olnet.org, 21 July [online], http://olnet.org/node/614 (Accessed 13 December 2011)

Kozinska, K (2011), Murilo Mendonca part II: more on collaboration with the OU, UK; OpenLearn use by UNISU VIRTUAL', olnet.org, 17 August [online], http://olnet.org/node/619 (Accessed 13 December 2011)

Santos, A; McAndrew, P and Mendonça, M (2010). Cultural imperialism or multicultural mix? Promoting OER reuse through collaboration. In: Open Educational Resources 2010 (OER10), 22-24 Mar 2010, Cambridge, United Kingdom. Available to download from: http://oro.open.ac.uk/26995/

Mendonça, Murilo and Santos, Andreia (2010). Unlocking Doors: the leading role of HEIs in creating an OER culture. In: GUIDE Association Workshop, April 2010, Rome, Italy. Details: http://oro.open.ac.uk/27062/

Mendonça, M M, McAndrew, P, Santos, A I (2011), Freeing up access to learning: the role for open educational resources, in Baldazzi, A., Ricci, L., Baroz, V.V. (eds) E-learning quality assurance: a multi-perspective approach, Gangemi Editore, Roma, pp. 121-138.

Update Since Fellowship

I have been planning on implementing a new UnisulVirtual OER webpage with more courses than what we have today in our collaborations area at LabSpace, and at UnisulVirtual we are trying to devise a way to validate self-taught knowledge acquired through OER. Also, UnisulVirtual was invited to participate in the Colearn Project, but so far we have not given any contributions to this project because we will need to allocate more personnel to work with OER.

 

Robyn Muldoon

Name

Dr Robyn Muldoon

Project Title

Investigating assessment and academic development practices

Project Summary

Robyn was funded by her own university to visit the UK in her academic sabbatical time and was hosted by the OLnet project, providing practical support for the period of her visit.  Her research was not directly related to OER.

Her aim was to investigate assessment practices both current and emerging, in higher education in Great Britain. Several of her past and current research interests, her then responsibilities, and also the strategic directions of her university converged and pointed to a need, in her view, for a massive culture change in regard to student assessment.

A related interest and core part of Robyn's work is academic development. With her period of study she wished to take the opportunity to investigate the practices of Teaching and Learning Centres in Great Britain in tandem with her investigation of assessment practices here.

Part of her ongoing research has involved investigating the benefits of reflective practice in student learning and the benefits to be gained from allowing students to manage and plan their learning and development. From this she developed an appreciation of benefits of ePortfolio practice and the opportunities presented for creative, student centred, meaningful assessment and feedback for lifelong learning. She is interested in the potential of virtual learning environments, including new and emerging technologies, to facilitate online and mobile communities of practice and related assessment and feedback opportunities.

Dates visited OU UK

27 June - 9 August 2011

Institution

University of New England, Australia

Biographic information

Robyn Muldoon was Leader of the Teaching and Learning Centre (TLC) Academic Team, at the University of New England (UNE), and Acting Director of the TLC for the 2 years prior to the Fellowship.

Robyn has been the recipient of several Australian awards for her work. In 2002 her team won a national teaching award for a university preparation program. In 2006 she was the leader of teams that won two national citations for exemplary, innovative support of non-traditional students and sustained excellence in creating an inclusive first year learning community. In 2010 Robyn received a personal national citation for leadership in the development of the New England Award, an innovative program which fosters students’ personal and professional development at university through extra-curricular activity.

The New England Award program, established  in 2004, has quickly gained recognition as a valuable adjunct to a student’s academic program in terms of both personal development and readiness for employment. Six other universities have invited Dr Muldoon to assist them in establishing similar programs.

Main Output

The primary outcome was an extensive report with recommendations for the UNE context submitted to UNE’s Assessment Policy Review. Robyn says "My thanks to the many enthusiastic OU staff, particularly in IET, and other OLnet Fellows, who generously shared their ideas and experience with me about innovative assessment practices, particularly in the e-learning environment."

Outputs

  • Extensive report with recommendations for the UNE context submitted to UNE’s Assessment Policy Review
  • Article submitted to leading Australian higher education journal (under review)
  • Article published on enabling education

References

Muldoon, R. 2011. Tertiary Enabling Education: Removing barriers to higher education. In P. Cunningham and N. Fretwell (eds.), Europe’s Future: Citizenship in a Changing World. London, CiCe: 288 - 297

Pauline Ngimwa

Name

Pauline Ngimwa

Project title

OER readiness in Africa

Dates

Visited Africa September and October 2009

Institution

The Open University, UK

Project summary

The aim of this project was to assess the Africa’s readiness to adopt OER. This involved an assessment of the technical and human related factors that impact on the successful adoption of OER. By technical factors the study was to look at the status of existing technological infrastructure, establish the extent it supports creation, access and use/re-use of OER, and identify existing gaps or limitations. The human factors consisted of issues such as skills levels, perceptions and attitudes. This project was carried out in form of a qualitative research of three case studies of higher education institutions located in Uganda, Kenya and South Africa. These institutions have been actively involved in the TESSA project. Findings of this investigation are contained in a report entitled: “OER Readiness in Africa, a report submitted to the Olnet project” (view/download here).

Biographical information

Pauline’s expertise is in the use of digital resources in higher education and information management sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa. She initially trained in information science and practiced as an information professional with the British Council in Kenya. Her interest in educational resources developed when she was tasked with the design and implementation of a digital library for the African Virtual University, a pan-African intergovernmental educational organization with a network of universities across Africa.

Availability of quality educational resources for a long time has been an issue for this region, which has result in weakened quality of education and research outputs. However, the emergence of modern digital technologies makes it possible to overcome barriers of access to these resources. African education institutions stand to benefit from the now widely available digital educational resources including OER and digital libraries. Pauline however believes that exploitation of these resources must be understood within the African education context if they are to be relevant. This calls for greater understanding of the prevailing contextual factors that support or hinder successful utilization of these digital resources. Hence, Pauline has been researching the contextual influences on the design and usage of digital educational resources within African higher education.

Main Output

Publication "OER Readiness in Africa: A report submitted to the OLnet Project" (2010) (view/download here)

Update Since Fellowship

Pauline completed her PhD in Educational Technology at the Open University towards the end of 2011. Her thesis was about the way in which academics in African higher education can work collaboratively with those who have expertise in modern digital technologies (i.e. e-learning technologists and information specialists) to design effective and learner-focused educational digital resources. To provide them with a design guidance tool, a collaborative design process model was developed following Human Computing Interaction (HCI) research approaches where three case studies of African universities (in Kenya, Uganda and South Africa) were investigated. The research findings showed the importance of national and institutional policies in the design process; the need to understand the role of global and adaptive technologies; and the different roles of design champions in the design process.

Pauline continued working at the OLnet project after her studies where she focused on reviewing the experiences and outputs of six fellows from Sub Saharan Africa (SSA) who had been sponsored by the OLnet project in partnership with the TESSA project in 2011. The fellows came from academic institutions already participating in the TESSA project which are located in four countries, namely: Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria and Mauritius.  A report titled “Achieving impact in Africa through openness: OLnet TESSA Fellowships” which outlines these experiences and describes the nature of impact this fellowship program has achieved is soon to be published.

Future plans are to return to Kenya where she intends to join the Higher Education sector and share her expertise in educational digital resources.

Jennifer Preece

Jennhy Preece OLnet Fellow

Name

Jennifer Preece

Project Title

Collaboration on the Reader to Leader framework

Project Summary

This project involved sharing ideas to better understand how to motivate contributions in user-generated content online sites. The reader-to-leader framework (Preece & Shneiderman, 2009) identifies four main stages that many people pass through from the time that they join a site as readers to the time they become leaders. Of course, not everyone goes through all four stages on every site. Some may stay as readers or move to being contributors but never become leaders. Many permutations are possible. For example, others jump from one type of activity to another depending on the topic of interest and their competence in that topic within a single site. A key contribution of this paper that was interesting to researchers in OLnet is that, based on a review of the research literature at that time, it suggests usability and sociability features that help to explain and motivate participation. Several OLnet researchers have modified this approach to explain their data.

Dates

Fellowship period: 7 April to 15 September 2010 including two short (2 day) visits in that period to the Open University, UK

Institution

University of Maryland, USA

Biographic information

Jennifer Preece is Professor of Information Studies in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, and Dean of the College of Information Studies – Maryland’s iSchool (see http://ischool.umd.edu/).  She completed her PhD in 1985 at The Open University, UK.  Her research focussed on information systems, computer-mediated communication, human-computer interaction, and online communities.  She was also an expert in distance education up to the mid 90s having spent some 15 years at the Open University, UK.

In 1994, Jenny became Research Professor of Information Systems and founding Director of the Centre for People and Systems Interaction at the South Bank University, London, UK.  In 1996 she moved to the USA and became Professor and Chair of the Information Systems Department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County in January 1997.  During the six years that she was department chair, they doubled the number of faculty, revised all of their programs, developed a distance Masters program, increased research productivity, and began to plan new programs in human-computer interaction.

Her current research focuses on the design and management of digital social media.  She is particularly interested in what motivates participation and the relationship between usability (design of the human-computer interface for ease of use) and sociability (technical design and social management – eg moderation, policies, support for evolving norms – that support social interaction) in online social spaces.

Jenny is currently the principle investigator on two National Science Foundation funded projects. One is entitled Extreme Ethnography, which focuses on understanding the challenges of doing ethnographical work in large online social spaces where there are millions of participants, content changes continually and the design of the supporting platforms also change frequently. The aim of this project is to develop guidelines to support researchers. The second project, entitled Biotracker, addresses two research questions:

  • Q1 How can a socially intelligent system be used to direct human effort and expertise to the most valuable collection and classification tasks?
  • Q2 What are the most effective strategies for motivating enthusiasts and experts to voluntarily contribute and collaborate?

Further information about these projects and publications can be found on the biotrackers.net website.

Main Output

Working with OLnet members they identified several shared interests that they continue to discuss and collaborate on, particularly in the areas of citizen science and how to motivate contributions in user generated content sites. For example, the reader-to-leader framework developed by Jenny Preece and Ben Shneiderman (2009) was used by Dr. Clough to analyze data from her doctoral study on geocaching.

During her visit Jenny met with OLnet doctoral students, faculty members, and staff to discuss OLnet projects and exchange ideas. She also gave a presentation about her own work, attended a project meeting and co-organized a workshop with Dr. Ann Jones. A working paper was written based on that workshop which is coauthored by Gill Clough, Ann Jones and Jenny Preece.

Jenny has continued to maintain contact with the iSpot team and she attended the Cross-roads meeting hosted by the iSpot team in October 2011. This meeting brought together members of citizen science researchers and developers from across the world including colleagues from the Encyclopedia of Life, who are collaborators on the Biotracker project. Jenny has also continued to work with Ann Jones and has provided comments on a draft proposal related to citizen science that is waiting funding.

Outputs

  • Workshop/meeting recorded in Flashmeeting April 2010

References

Cropper, Karen (2010), ‘OLnet Fellow Jenny Preece Visit April 2010’, olnet.org, 13 April [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/355 (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Preece, J and Shneiderman, B (2009), ‘The Reader-to-Leader Framework: Motivating Technology-Mediated Social Participation’, [online], http://aisel.aisnet.org/thci/vol1/iss1/5/ (Accessed 2 Feb 2012)

Update Since Fellowship

The collaborative activities mentioned in the previous section on outputs are being continued.

Other Reference of interest

Jones, Ann and Preece, Jenny (2006). Online communities for teachers and lifelong learners: a framework for comparing similarities and identifying differences in communities of practice and communities of interest. International Journal of Learning Technology, 2(2-3), pp. 112–137. Available online from: http://oro.open.ac.uk/cgi/export/6336/SummaryPage/oro-eprint-6336.html

Ágnes Sándor

Agnes Sandor OLnet Fellow

Name

Ágnes Sándor

Project Title

Integrating Human & Machine Document Annotation for Sensemaking

Project Summary

This project involved the collaboration between The Open University's Knowledge Media Institute's Hypermedia Discourse Group (Simon Buckingham Shum, Anna De Liddo and Michelle Bachler) and Ágnes Sándor (Xerox Research Centre Europe, Parsing & Semantics Group).

This research project investigated the overlaps and complementarities between the outputs from human analysts making sense of 120 OER project reports, using KMi's Cohere semantic annotation and knowledge mapping tool, and machine annotation of the corpus by the Xerox Incremental Parser (XIP). XIP's output was imported into Cohere to explore ways to visualize the combined human+machine output, and then some of the analysts were interviewed on video to elicit their views on XIP's annotations.

Dates visited OU UK

4 October - 12 November 2010 and attendance at CSCW conference 11-15 Feb 2012

Institution

Xerox Research Centre Europe, France

Biographic information

Ágnes Sándor is a Research Scientist in the Parsing and Semantics Department of Xerox Research Centre Europe.  She holds a PhD in linguistics. Her research area is automatic discourse analysis.

Main Output

The fellowship made possible the integration of knowledge mapping, human and machine annotation of the OER project reports in order to then summarize the main issues and challenges of the OER movement.

Outputs

  • 2 Blog posts
  • KMI Seminar - video of presentation open access
  • Journal paper in Special issue of the CSCW Journal on "Collective Intelligence in Organizations"
  • Preparation of Workshop for the CSCW conference in Seattle, February 11. 2012.
  • Video submission accepted for the CSCW conference in Seattle, February 15. 2012.

References

Buckingham Shum, S (2010), 'OLnet Expert Fellow Ágnes Sándor: report', olnet.org, 12 November [online] http://olnet.org/node/512 (Accessed 14 December 2011)

Buckingham Shum, S (2010), 'Collaboration with Ágnes Sándor, Xerox', Simon.BuckinghamShum.net, 12 November [online] http://people.kmi.open.ac.uk/sbs/2010/11/collaboration-with-agnes-sandor-xerox/ (Accessed 14 December 2011)

Buckingham Shum, S (2011), 'OLnet@PARC: Contested Collective Intelligence', olnet.org, 5 April [online] http://olnet.org/node/582 (Accessed 14 December 2011)

Buckingham Shum, S; Sándor, Á; De Liddo, A; Bachler, M (2010) 'Integrating Human and Machine Document Annotation for Sensemaking', KMI Podium, 11 November [online] http://stadium.open.ac.uk/stadia/preview.php?s=29&whichevent=1567 (Accessed 14 December 2011)

De Liddo, A; Sándor, Á; Buckingham Shum, S (2011) 'Contested Collective Intelligence: Rationale, Technologies, and a Human-Machine Annotation Study'. In press.  Special issue of the CSCW Journal on "Collective Intelligence in Organizations"

De Liddo, A; Sándor, Á; Buckingham Shum, S (2012) Workshop 'Collective Intelligence as Community Discourse and Action, CSCW conference in Seattle, February 11. 2012. http://events.kmi.open.ac.uk/cscw-ci2012/

De Liddo, A; Sándor, Á; Buckingham Shum, S (2012) 'Cohere+XIP: Human Annotation Harnessing Machine Annotation Power'. Video submission accepted for the CSCW conference in Seattle, February 15. 2012. http://www.slideshare.net/AnnaDeLiddo1/cscw2012videostoryboard

Update Since Fellowship

Ágnes says, "I have remained in close contact with the Open University, continuing to work on our ideas on combining human and machine annotation for collective intelligence."

 

Charles Severance

Name

Dr Charles R Severance

Project Title

Adding IMS Basic Learning Tools Interoperability to Cohere

Project Summary

In this visit, Chuck worked with Simon Buckingham Shum, Michelle Bachler, and others to design and build IMS Basic Learning Tools Interoperability (imsglobal.org/developers/BLTI) Provider for the Cohere idea mapping tool (cohere.open.ac.uk).

Dates visited OU UK

8-11 June 2010

Institution

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Biographic information

Charles Severance is currently a Clinical Associate Professor and teaches in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. Charles is a founding faculty member of the Informatics Concentration undergraduate degree program at the University of Michigan. Charles also works with the IMS Global Learning Consortium promoting and developing standards for teaching and learning technology. Previously he was the Executive Director of the Sakai Foundation and the Chief Architect of the Sakai Project.

Charles is the author of the book, "Sakai Free as in Freedom" that describes the early days of the open source Sakai project. Charles is also the author of the book, "Using Google App Engine" from O'Reilly and Associates and the book "Python for Informatics: Exploring Information". He also wrote the O'Reilly book titled, "High Performance Computing". Charles has a background in standards including serving as the vice-chair for the IEEE Posix P1003 standards effort and edited the Standards Column in IEEE Computer Magazine from 1995-1999.

Main Output

Demonstration software to integrate Cohere integrated into Moodle using Basic LTI.

Outputs

  • Demonstration software.
  • Video report, which includes an overview of the visit and demonstration of the software.
  • Two blog posts.

References

Severance, C (2010), ‘OLNet Report: Integrating Cohere into Moodle Using IMS Basic LTI’, Dr. Chucks Blog, 19 June [online], http://www.dr-chuck.com/csev-blog/2010/06/olnet-report-integrating-cohere-into-moodle-using-ims-basic-lti/ (Accessed 28 November 2011)

OLNet Report: Integrating Cohere into Moodle Using IMS Basic LTI (2010), Vimeo video, added by Charles Severance [online], http://vimeo.com/12700689/ (Accessed 28 November 2011) - Embedded below

Severance, C (2011), ‘What are the Key Challenges for the OER Movement?’, Dr. Chucks Blog, 11 October [online],  http://www.dr-chuck.com/csev-blog/2011/10/what-are-the-key-challenges-for-the-oer-movement/ (Accessed 28 November 2011)

OLNet Report: Integrating Cohere into Moodle Using IMS Basic LTI from Charles Severance on Vimeo.

George Siemens

Name

George Siemens

Project Title

Building a Massive Online Open Course (MOOC), Change: Education, Learning, and Technology!

Dates visited the UK

6 to 23 July 2011

Institution

Complexive Systems Inc, Canada

Biographic information

George Siemens is an internationally known writer, speaker, and researcher on learning, networks, technology and organizational effectiveness in digital environments. He is the author of Knowing Knowledge, an exploration of how the context and characteristics of knowledge have changed and what it means to organizations today, and the recently released Handbook of Emerging Technologies for Learning. Siemens is currently a researcher and strategist with the Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute at Athabasca University.

Previously, George was the Associate Director, Research and Development, with the Learning Technologies Centre at University of Manitoba. His research interests include social software, learning networks, emerging technology, learning analytics and visualization, and the design of organizations in response to social and technological change pressures. Together with Stephen Downes and Dave Cormier, Siemens has pioneered open connectivist courses that have included thousands of educators and students as participants. He is a frequent keynote speakers at conference detailing the influence of technology and media on education, organizations, and society. Siemens has maintained the elearnspace blog (www.elearnspace.org/blog) for ten years and www.connectivism.ca for five years. Additional background information is available at www.elearnspace.org/about.htm.

Main Output

The thinking behind and preparation for the MOOC, Change: Education, Learning and Technology. The course introduces participants to the major contributions being made to the field of instructional technology by researchers today. Each week, a new professor or researcher will introduce his or her central contribution to the field. Facilitated by Dave Cormier, George Siemens and Stephen Downs.

Video: An interview with George Siemens

Elsebeth Sorensen

 

Name

Dr Elsebeth Korsgaard Sorensen

Project Title

OER Innovative Design

Project Summary

While spending a semester at The Open University as an expert research fellow affiliated with OLnet, Elsebeth carried out research, in collaboration with Professor Graínne Conole, on:

1) Innovative design, delivery and evaluation of an OER-approach to teaching and learning online (among other things, this aspect addresses the characteristics of sustainable OER-models, OER-concepts and OER-tools/resources that will enhance intercultural sharing and collaboration in online teaching and learning in higher education?

2) Innovative design of OER based communication and dissemination mechanisms to support the intercultural education and competence development of researchers (this part is addressing OER essential to becoming a professional researcher.

The two areas evolve around the notion of creativity and OER in design of open communication and learning in a digitalized, multicultural global perspective.

Dates visited OU UK

13 September – 20 December 2010

Institution

Aarhus University, Denmark

Biographic information

Elsebeth is associate Professor, Ph.D., in ICT, Communication and Learning, Dept. of Information & Media Studies, Aarhus University in Denmark. While still at Aalborg University, before taking up her post Aarhus University, she was director of the successful master programme in ICT and Learning (MIL), offered in equal collaboration between five Danish Universities (Aalborg University, Aarhus University, Copenhagen Business School, the Danish Pedagogical University, and Roskilde University). A decade ago she was one of the initiators and designers of the programme and has since then continuously been a member of the steering group of MIL, as well as a designer, teacher and supervisor.

For many years Elsebeth has been engaged in national and international research activities within design, delivery and evaluation of technology supported open learning processes. Her research - which is directed towards both the field of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL), distance and open learning (DE) and eLearning - comprises pedagogical/instructional design and implementation of technology across virtual and physical teaching and learning contexts. The perspective of this research is formed by communicative and learning theoretical positions and has its main focus on the pedagogical and instructional aspects around the establishment of dialogue, reflection and collaboration across digital and physical contexts, as well as on the realisation of Problem-Oriented Project Pedagogy (POPP) across these spaces.

Currently, Elsebeth’s research is focusing intensively on the enhancement of teaching and learning across virtual and physical contexts, raising questions such as:

  1. how to make use of the potential of digital and mobile technologies (incl. Web 2.0 and social software) in design of dialogic teaching and learning processes in higher education contexts,
  2. how to utilize the power of digital and mobile technologies (incl. Web 2.0 and social software, interactive whiteboards, computer games, mobile phones and video, etc.) in high school contexts, and
  3. how to use the power of digital and mobile technologies and OER as reflective tools in the pursued of the ongoing global process of advancing learner empowerment and digital democratic citizenship.

Main Output

Special journal issue on creativity and Open Educational Resources (OER), Special issue of EURODL.

Outputs

  • Presentation to OLnet Team meeting 30 November 2010
  • Collaborative international bids to Danish agencies for funding (with Graínne Conole)

References

Conole, G (2010), ‘EURODL special issue on OER and creativity - call for papers’, cloudworks, 3 November [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloud/view/4754 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

‘CALL Special Themed Issue on Creativity and Open Educational Resources (OER)’ (2011), EURODL [online], http://www.eurodl.org/?p=special&sp=init2 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Sorensen, E., Conole, G. and Harlung, A.H. (2010), Special journal issue on creativity and Open Educational Resources (OER), Special issue of EURODL. http://www.eurodl.org/?p=special&sp=init2 (Accessed 17 January 2012)

Sorensen, E (2010) ‘Elsebeth Korsgaard Sorensen’, olnet.org, 3 October [online], http://olnet.org/node/489 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Sorensen, E (2010) ‘Presentation at the OLnet researchers meeting Nov. 30’, olnet.org, 13 December [online], http://olnet.org/node/538 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

Sorensen, E (2010) ‘My Olnet time went so quickly.....’, olnet.org, 13 December [online] http://olnet.org/node/539 (Accessed 30 November 2011)

David Wiley

Name

Dr David Wiley

Project Title

What are the benefits of OER?

Project Summary

David Wiley's visit was a relatively short stay that allowed him to read, think, discuss and write about his topic of what are the benefits of the openness in relation to OER.  During his visit he had a number of group discussions with academics working in the field of OER, including the OLnet team members and Support Centre for Open Resources in Education (SCORE) Fellows.

Dates visited OU UK

22-30 July 2011

Institution

Brigham Young University, USA

Biographic information

David Wiley is Associate Professor of Instructional Psychology and Technology at Brigham Young University, where he also leads the Access to Knowledge Initiative in the David O McKay School of Education's Center for the Improvement of Teacher Education and Schooling.

David is founder and board member of the Open High School of Utah and Chief Openness Officer of Flat World Knowledge. David was formerly Associate Professor of Instructional Technology and Director of the Center for Open and Sustainable Learning at Utah State University. David has been a Non-resident Fellow at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, a Visiting Scholar at the Open University of the Netherlands, and a recipient of the US National Science Foundation's CAREER grant. David is also the Founder of OpenContent.org and was recently named one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business. His career is dedicated to increasing access to educational opportunity for everyone around the world.

Main Output

I’ve yet to formally publish anything from my time spent in the UK as an OLnet Fellow, but I have written a blog post as one of the outputs from that period, which is informed significantly by conversations with the brilliant and welcome folks at the OU, as well as past online exchanges with many colleagues in the OER community.

Outputs

  • 3 blog posts
  • Presentation at OLnet Team meeting and discussion
  • Presentation at SCORE Fellows Meeting and discussion
  • Video interview (in process of editing to be loaded online)

References

Wiley, D (2011), 'The Primary Challenge for the OER Movement', iterating toward openness, 10 October [online] http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/2042 (Accessed 17 January 2012)

Wiley, D (2011), 'On OER – Beyond Definitions', iterating toward openness, 27 September [online] http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/2015 (Accessed 17 January 2012)

Wiley, D (2011), 'The General Confusion Around “Open”', iterating toward openness, 16 March [online] http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/1800 (Accessed 17 January 2012)

Update Since Fellowship

In January 2012, David was appointed Senior Fellow for Open Education at the National Center for Research in Advanced Information and Digital Technologies, also known as Digital Promise, a new national center created by Congress to research, develop, and scale up technologies that can transform the way teachers teach and students learn. David will advise the center as it develops policy recommendations through a series of white papers and works to establish a broader Digital Promise Fellows program. (See: sltrib.com)

 

Sandra Wills

OLnet Fellow Sandra Wills

Screenshot from IET Coffee Morning video

Name

Sandra Wills

Project Title

Learning Design Descriptions for Online Role Play and Simulation

Dates visited the UK

30 August to 6 October 2011

Institution

University of Wollongong, Australia

Project Summary

In order to contribute to OLnet’s research agenda (building a robust evidence base to support and enhance the design, evaluation and use of OER), this fellowship aimed to:

  • build researcher discussions within Cloudworks around two existing rich collections of learning designs on online role play and simulation
  • refine frameworks for description of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning designs
  • test visualisation metaphors for accessing learning design descriptions in repositories.

The project built on four long term projects in which Prof Wills was involved.

  • Learning Designs Project, a grant from the Australian Universities Teaching Committee to distill the essence of design from more than 100 previously funded AUTC multimedia projects, of particular relevance the learning design for online role play (Wills & Ip, 2002; Oliver et al., 2007)
  • Project EnROLE, a grant from the Australian Learning & Teaching Council to establish a repository and community of practice around online role play (Wills et al, 2009)
  • Her PhD which was a longitudinal study of online role play in Australian higher education (Wills, 2010)
  • Over ten years of work at University of Wollongong establishing Teaching Research Nexus, Peer Review and Promotions Criteria for Teaching

Dates visited OU UK

30 August to 6 October 2011

Institution

University of Wollongong, Australia

Biographic information

Professor Sandra Wills is Executive Director, Learning & Teaching, Academic Services Division as well as Foundation Chair of Educational Development at University of Wollongong and founder of Project EnRoLE. She has been at the University of Wollongong for over 18 years as Director of the centres responsible for academic development and e-learning.

Major recent projects include the University's Strategic Plan for eLearning and Teaching; implementation of a new Learning Management System; Peer Review of Teaching in promotion procedures; review of student surveys; review of University Teaching & Learning Course Policy; framework for a new Graduate Certificate in Higher Education; guidelines for academic progression based on teaching; support of sessional teaching; the Learning-Teaching-Researching Nexus; The UOW Learning Experience; Learning Leaders leadership training for Heads; First Year Experience; review of English Language Proficiency; innovative learning spaces.

Sandra has 40 years international experience in the field of education and technology from primary through to university education including teacher training, curriculum development, software development and senior management. She has authored over 150 publications, is active on the international lecture circuit, and recently achieved her 100th invited keynote address.

Main Output

“The OLnet Fellowship was personally rewarding in providing me with time to follow up on my previous research in conjunction with invigorating conversations with the highly experienced Open University colleagues. It was also beneficial to my university as I was able to return with clearer plans for ramping up our open educational practices.”

Outputs

  • Presentation to OLnet Team
  • Presentation (video open access) to IET Coffee Morning about project EnRoLE
  • Presentation to SCORE Fellows
  • Cloudscape for researcher discussions around an existing rich collection of learning designs on online role play and simulation (http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2344)
  • Developed business case and gained approval for University of Wollongong to join OERUni consortium as foundation partner
  • Revised University of Wollongong Strategic Plan for eLearning to more explicitly have one of its goals focussed on Open Educational Practice

References

IET Tech Coffee Morning – Enrolling academics in sharing teaching ideas: building a community of practice about online role (2011), cloudworks, 14 September [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2327 (Accessed 20 December 2011)

Oliver, R., Harper, B., Wills, S., Agostinho, S. & Hedberg, J. Describing ICT-based learning designs that promote quality learning outcomes. In H.Beetham & R.Sharpe (Eds.) Rethinking pedagogy for the Digital Age. Routledge

Wills, S. & Ip, A. (2002) enRole, Research, React, Resolve, Reflect: Developing and using online role play learning designs. Retrieved September 20th 2010, from Learning Designs Web site: http://www.learningdesigns.uow.edu.au/guides/info/G1/index.htm

Wills, S (2011), ‘EnROLE’, cloudworks, 15 September [online], http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2344 (Accessed 20 December 2011)

Wills, S. (2010). Factors influencing the design of reusable e-learning activities in higher education. unpublished doctoral thesis, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Wills, S., Rosser, E., Devonshire, E., Leigh, E., Russell, C. & Shepherd, J. (2009). Encouraging role based online learning environments by Building, Linking, Understanding, Extending: The BLUE Report. Australian Learning and Teaching Council ISBN: 978-1-74128-173-6. Retrieved September 20th 2010 from http://ro.uow.edu.au/asdpapers/116/ (Accessed 20 December 2011)

Update Since Fellowship

“I am continuing development of the Cloudworks site with a view to launching an online discussion with the community at a relevant face to face event (with possible joint publication later).  This might have happened at the LAMS conference in December, but it clashed with a quality audit I was chairing.  It is likely that reporting on the discussion will be at ICEM2012 in Cyprus in September”.

“I have carried out further testing of the Simulation Triad as a valid learning design description for role play, games & simulations at an international working conference in Sydney to write a book. My chapter is the lead chapter and maps most other chapters onto the Simulation Triad: Wills, S. (2012) The Simulation Triad. In Transforming university teaching into learning via simulations, games and role plays, Libri Publishing (pending).

“We are now working to revise UOW Intellectual Property Statute around Creative Commons Licensing.

“I intend to return to the Evidence Hub to enter design factors for reusable e-learning activities (from my doctoral research) to compare and contrast with Pegler's doctoral outcomes on a related topic (with possible joint publication later).”

OLnet TESSA fellows

The OLnet-TESSA Fellowship scheme is closed. The OLnet project is not currently recruiting any more Fellows.

 

Introduction

The OLnet project offered five (5) special Fellowships in partnership with the TESSA project. These Fellowships were open to scholars and other educational professionals from Sub Saharan countries where TESSA already operates (Countries: Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia), who are affiliated to an academic institution and have an interest in researching Open Educational Resources (OER) and their use to support teacher education.  An additional piece of research work was funded in Uganda without a visit to the UK as it offered such great value for money.

 The Fellows

Priti Auckloo OLNet-TESSA Fellow 

Pritee Auckloo (Mauritius) - Lecturer at Mauritius Institute of Education, for a study of 'Understanding Teachers’ Choices in Validating Quality driven Open Educational Resources'
More info | Other info

Juliana Bbuye OLnet-TESSA Fellow 

Juliana Bbuye (Uganda) - Lecturer Makerere University, Uganda, for a study of 'Skills for Sustainable and Successful Use of OER: A case study of TESSA Materials in use in Primary schools of Uganda'
More info | Other info

Anu Gungadeen OLNet-TESSA Fellow 

Anuradha Gungadeen - Lecturer in Open & Distance Learning at Mauritius Institute of Education, for a study of 'Sustainable and Effective Use of OERs in Existing Primary Curriculum'
More info | Other info

OLnet TESSA Fellow Doris Kaije 

Doris Kaije (Uganda) - Lecturer at Kyambogo University, Uganda, for a study of 'Large Classes as a Challenge to Implementing TESSA Materials in Rural Primary Schools in Uganda'
More info | Other info

Fred Keraro OLnet TESSA Fellow 

Fred Keraro (Kenya) - Professor at Egerton University, Kenya, for a study of 'The Readiness for Sustainable and Successful Use of OER in Higher Education in Kenya: A case study of Egerton University'
More info | Other info

Dele Yaya OLnet TESSA Fellow 

Dele Yaya (Nigeria) - National Teachers Institute, Nigeria for a study of 'Sustainable and Successful Use of OER in the Programmes of the National Teachers’ Institute, Nigeria'
More info | Other info

 

 

Pritee Auckloo

 

Name

Pritee Auckloo

Project Title

Understanding Teachers’ Choices in Validating Quality driven Open Educational Resources

Project Summary

This project focused on investigating contextual factors that affect primary school teachers’ choices and the processes involved in adapting and re-using OER. MIE is involved in improving access to quality education and digital pedagogies as a contribution towards making Mauritius a ‘Knowledge Hub’ within the region. In light of this, Pritee has actively been working with primary school teachers to help them appreciate and use OER in the classroom setting. When she started, teachers were not aware of OER. They did not know they could use the TESSA OER and adapt them for their classroom settings. Through her active involvement including activities such as the ‘Creative Teachers’ competition, teachers now come to know and appreciate the value of these resources. However, she thinks there should be greater understanding of how teachers are using these resources within their classroom settings. Framing her project within this background, Pritte’s particular interest was to investigate an approach that would drive the classroom practitioner as a continuous critic and assessor of quality OER. She used a small scale action research that adopted a community based approach where she carried out an examination of the processes and variables that influence practitioners’ choices as well as a quality assessment for sustaining and validating open educational content. To guide the development of the research, she used the following research questions:

  • What influences the choice of teachers in the adaptation of TESSA materials?
  • What types of adaptations can teachers propose and what levels of adaptations are practiced?
  • How do teacher-led adaptations influence teaching and learning in classroom situations?

Dates visited the UK

24 January to 4 February 2011

Institution

Mauritius Institute of Education (MIE), Mauritius

Biographical information

Pritee is a lecturer in education at the School of Education at MIE. Besides her teaching role, she has also been actively involved in rolling out the TESSA project at her institution since 2009. One of her memorable achievements in the TESSA project is when she led the ‘Calling all Creative Teachers’ competition in Mauritius. Teachers from across Africa had been invited to share their experience of using TESSA activities with their pupils by submitting a written account. Using her personal initiative, she brought together a group of primary school teachers to submit their entries. Out of the five winners, four came from her team! Commenting on this success, an Open University senior academic who has worked with Pritee observes that:

“The teachers were strongly influenced by her dynamic personality and drive to use the resources in the classroom and, as part of their professional development work, prepare examples of what had worked well in their classroom and how it had affected pupil learning”.

She is a project coordinator of a related project called ‘Millennium Development Goals with Creative Teachers’ in Mauritius and Rodrigues. She is also a recipient of the British Council Scholarship for Interaction Leadership Program that enables African professionals to sustain leadership and belief in the future. This opportunity widened her understanding of the African continent outside Mauritius, which she finds relevant as she conceptualizes OER within African context.

Her research interest focuses on the adaptation of OER materials in primary school education and more specifically, quality and evaluation issues relating to the sustainability and effectiveness of OER in Mauritius. This arises from her observation that very few people in Mauritius know about open learning and OER and she is therefore determined to see more get involved in the OER movement.  She is currently in the process of registering for her doctoral programme where she hopes to carry out more research in this area.

As a regular reader of the TESSA newsletter, Pritee came to learn about the OLnet-TESSA fellowship program from one of the issues and her application was successfully considered.

Main output

Her project report on “Open Educational resources in Mauritius: Lessons learnt in a Mauritian context”

Other outputs

  • Two conference presentations
  • Module on the use of OER in classroom situations integrated in Teachers’ Diploma Primary program at the MIE: Creative Pedagogy encouraging further investigation about the use and effectiveness of OERS in primary education.

References

Auckloo, Pritee (2011). From call for creative teachers to Millennium Development Goals with creative teachers: Mauritius and Rodrigues. In: DETA pre-conference workshop, 3-5 August, 2011, Maputo, Mozambique.

Auckloo, Pritee (2011). Innovative Teacher Education: Improving Classroom Practices with Open Educational Resources. In: The International Conference on Learning, July 2011, Mauritius.

Kozinska, K (2011),"OLnet TESSA visiting Fellows from Mauritius (24 January - 4 February 2011): Anuradha (Anu) Gungadeen and Pritee Auckloo", olnet.org, 3 February [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/555 (Accessed 21 February 2012)

DETA conference

Pritee used this conference to understand more about OER use within classroom setting and to meet people who share this interest. One specific contact she made was Dr Umar of the Commonwealth of Learning who expressed the need to know more about what was happening in the classroom situation and the importance of obtaining data concerning teacher’s use of OER in the classroom.

She made a presentation that demonstrated her work in extending OER in the Rodrigues Island, a very small island and although autonomous, it follows Mauritian education system and teachers are trained in Mauritius (see further details below). By showcasing how she is supporting the implementation of TESSA OER in this island, she was able to put it on the OER map.

Update since fellowship

As well as completing her project, Pritee has been involved in a number of OER related activities since the fellowship. First, upon returning from her OU visit, she shared TESSA/OLnet resources with the group of teachers she is working with. This broadened their understanding of these two projects and they came to see their international scope rather than these being only UK-based projects. Second, she has developed a module concerning the use of OER, basing it on TESSA resources. Third, she has presented a paper on “Innovative Teacher Education: Improving Classroom Practices with Open Educational Resources” during the International Learning Conference held in Mauritius last July. This gave her an opportunity to talk about her work in open education and OER within the Mauritian context.

Lastly, she has been leading and coordinating a project called the “MDG with Creative Teachers” project which includes Rodrigues Island. With the help the support from the Commission for Education in Mauritius, this project looks at how teachers and learners along with their parents can contribute towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals in a novel and creative way using OER. To mark the success of this achievement, she led a celebratory event called “Let’s go fly a kite and flock to the beach in Rodrigues Island”  where learners from participating schools together with their teachers and parents celebrated their achievement in contributing towards the OER project. She also shared her involvement in leading this project during the DETA pre-conference workshop.

In carrying out the above activities, Pritee’s aim is to create a community of OER users.

 

Text extracted from pre-publication draft of report by Pauline Ngimwa, "Achieving impact in Africa through openness: OLnet TESSA Fellowships", March 2012. Full details of this publication will be available on this website when available.

Juliana Bbuye

Julian Bbuye

Image CC-BY Natalie Eggleston, OLnet

Name

Juliana Bbuye

Project title

Skills for sustainable and successful use of OER: a case study of TESSA materials in use in primary schools of Uganda

Project Summary

Primary schools in Uganda are slowly but consistently taking up the use of TESSA OER in the teaching practice. Teachers who have taken up TESSA OER are gradually developing into facilitators rather than transmitters of knowledge. This is an important shift in an environment that has been dominated by the traditional teacher-centred teaching and learning taking place in classes with as many as 60-100 pupils. In this setting, teachers are encouraged to prepare notes for the whole term and then go to the classroom and deliver these notes. Moreover, teaching often takes place in contexts with limited resources and poor infrastructure. TESSA materials encourage learner-centred pedagogy rather than teacher centred approach. Materials are prepared to fit contexts with poor infrastructure and resources, and are intended to utilise local resources. To master and integrate the use of the TESSA OER,  teachers need to acquire skills for adapting the TESSA OER for use in classroom setting, i.e. preparation of a lesson based on TESSA OER and integrating use of  local resources and participatory learning methods. Teachers also need to acquire skills related to learner-centred teaching, what it is and what it involves, and also skills of identifying the right method to use in any particular classroom environment.

Juliana’s project hoped to investigate skills required for this pedagogical change from teacher-centred to learner-centred teaching approach using OER. She also wanted to find out how those teachers already using TESSA are going about it, how they are dealing with infrastructural challenges and how they are handling large classes using TESSA materials that encourage group work. The study was an action research utilising a number of methods i.e. documentary review of previous reports on use of TESSA materials, school visits to observe lessons by teachers making use of TESSA materials, questionnaires and interviews with teachers who use TESSA materials which also provided reflections of their practice and video clips to provide evidence and examples for other teachers to reflect on required skills as they start using TESSA materials.

Dates visited the UK

15 to 27 May 2011

Institution

Makerere University, Uganda

Biographical information

Juliana works as a lecturer in the Department of Open and Distance Learning, College of Education and External Studies at Makerere University. Her area of specialisation is distance education. She holds a Post Graduate Diploma in Distance Education from the Extension College London and has recently defended her PhD thesis where she looked at the development of learner support systems of private and public universities in Uganda.

She has previously held administrative roles at the university including heading the Materials Section in the Department of Distance Education and later on the leadership of the department.

Juliana remains active in this area and has conducted research in distance education and adult education. She was part of a working group on a World Bank project that sought to establish the impact of Non-Governmental Organisations in adult learning in Uganda. She also participated in the research carried out by the Commonwealth of Learning on Distance Education in non formal organisations.

Her interest in open educational resources (OER) is closely linked with her participation in the TESSA project at her university where she has been a keen participant. She got involved right from the beginning when the project was being introduced at the university. She has since participated as a user as well as in promoting usage within primary schools through a series of training workshops, and through action research project.

Main output

The main output of this research project is a report that identifies skills required for sustainable and successful use of OER among primary school teachers in Uganda

Other outputs

Posters and video clips showing and explaining the use of learner-centred methods in primary schools have been produced to be used as a motivation for schools that want to adopt learner centres approaches in primary schools. These resources are used in the workshops and also were presented during the DETA conference.

References

Kozinska, K (2011), "Juliana Bbuye: OLnet, TESSA, and the educators of tomorrow", olnet.org, 7 July [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/615 (Accessed 21 February 2012)

DETA pre-conference workshop

Juliana participated in the conference as a delegate and was also able to do a poster presentation of the teachers’ experiences in the various schools that have adopted TESSA resources depicting how they use TESSA materials in their teaching. She also met people and learnt from their experiences of how they have implemented the TESSA resources in their contexts. Additionally, the entire process of developing, using and assessing impact of the TESSA materials became clearer to Juliana as she was able to see how her institution can optimise the benefits of these resources.

Juliana made very useful contacts for her future work with OER at the university. She has continued to collaborate and share experiences with people she met and especially those who were in this fellowship program. They update each other on forthcoming events and publications, and she has future plan to involve them in her institution as reviewers of study materials, mentors for staff on the use of TESSA materials in schools and teacher training and in developing joint publications.

She met people representing organisations that have been funding OER initiatives i.e. the Hewlett Foundation and the Commonwealth of Learning and she is hoping to submit a proposal to seek funding for her dissemination activity. Her contact with SAIDE has resulted in her receiving regular newsletters.

Update since fellowship

The investigation is in progress and there are already some key findings. In the first instance, Juliana has established that teachers acquire the learner-centred methodology as they use these resources. Action research approach is such that teachers are engaged as they plan how they are using these TESSA OER, and then after teaching a lesson using these resources, they discuss their experiences. This is a learning process as they inform and learn from each other. In the process, they have formed a community of users.

Juliana has also been engaged in school visits where teachers invite her to carry out TESSA OER workshops. Together with her TESSA team, they have carried out seven workshops for teachers and head teachers in schools mainly around the university. In these workshops, they show them how to incorporate TESSA materials in their teaching.

The team has also worked with the National Curriculum Development Centre to incorporate TESSA materials in curriculum for primary 6 and 7.

 

Text extracted from pre-publication draft of report by Pauline Ngimwa, "Achieving impact in Africa through openness: OLnet TESSA Fellowships", March 2012. Full details of this publication will be available on this website when available.

Anuradha Gungadeen

Name

Anuradha Gungadeen

Project Title

Sustainable and effective use of open educational resources (OER) in existing primary curriculum with a view to enable technology enhanced pedagogy and community of practice through wiring schools

Project Summary

The purpose of this project was to enable teachers upgrade their skills in manipulating open educational software and in infusing identified technological tools in developing OER.

The main reason for her visit was experience what goes on at the Open University as far as OER activities are concerned. She uses the analogy of the OU being a factory and her wanting to discover how OER are manufactured and the entire process that goes on within the factory. She was interested in deepening her knowledge in development of re-usable open and distance open learning resources and the impact of digital media on learning. Hence she used her visit to learn from experts in OLnet, TESSA, SCORE and Knowledge Media Institute (KMI) what they were using, developing and researching in open source software and digital media in the creation of OER. Ultimately, this helped her refine her research ideas and focus her project. She enjoyed access to OU facilities such as the library and the Institute of Educational Technology (IET)’s Super Pod.

Dates visited the UK

24 January to 4 February 2011

Institution

Mauritius Institute of Education (MIE), Mauritius

Biographical information

Anuradha is a lecturer at the Centre for Open and Distance learning, School of Education at MIE. She has an interest in educational technology and is current pursuing a PhD in this field. She also has a Masters degree in Computer Mediated Communication and Pedagogies, and an additional qualification in managing and facilitating online instruction offered jointly by the University of West Indies and the Commonwealth of Learning (COL).

Her involvement in OER started about eight years ago when she worked at the Virtual centre for Innovative Learning Technologies at University of Mauritius. Then she became involved with the COL’s project called The Virtual University for Small States of the Commonwealth (VUSSC) and learnt about OER and the open education software. Her encounter with the TESSA project was accidental, her then head of the centre had asked her to prepare a report and in the process she came to know about this project. Her personal initiative to search for short-term training scholarships earned her an opportunity to become a TESSA/OLnet fellow.

Her research interest focuses on the adaptation of OER materials in primary school education and more specifically, quality and evaluation issues relating to the sustainability and effectiveness of OER in Mauritius. This arises from her observation that very few people in Mauritius know about open learning and OER and she is therefore determined to see more get involved in the OER movement.  She is currently in the process of registering for her doctoral programme where she hopes to carry out more research in this area.

Main output

A project report on “Sustainable and effective use of Open Educational resources in existing primary curriculum with a view to enable technology enhanced pedagogy and community of practice through wiring schools”

Other outputs

Presentation at DETA pre-conference workshop

References

Gungadeen, Anuradha (2011). Use of Compendium Tool in Teacher Education to create digital OERs. In: DETA pre-conference workshop, 3-5 August, 2011, Maputo, Mozambique.

Kozinska, K (2011),"OLnet TESSA visiting Fellows from Mauritius (24 January - 4 February 2011): Anuradha (Anu) Gungadeen and Pritee Auckloo", olnet.org, 3 February [online], http://www.olnet.org/node/555 (Accessed 21 February 2012)

DETA pre-conference workshop

Anuradha’s main objective for attending the conference was to share what she had learnt in the course of her fellowship, what she had achieved and her successes and failures as she implemented her project. She also hoped to learn from the others and take what they were sharing and apply it to her context. As she attended the sessions and interacted with the other delegate, her pre-existing perceptions of the status of technology use in education were challenged. For example she was pleasantly surprised to discover how far the continent had moved forward in relation to overcoming technological barriers. Secondly, she was delighted to see a positive shift in gender participation as she observed that there were many women attending the conference.

However, Anuradha has some regrets because networking after the conference has not happened as she had envisaged. During her interaction with the contacts she made, there were plans for the way forward after sharing their experiences. However she says that this has not happened yet. 

Anuradha was also able to present her experience in introducing the compendium tool to her student and what she had learnt in the process.

Update since fellowship

In the first place, she has managed to pass on the knowledge she acquired during her OU visit to her students. One of her key learning points was how the Compendium tool delivered by OU’s KMI has been developed and used to support learning. She has been able to apply what she learnt about this tool by introducing it to her students who had no previous knowledge of mindmaps. In one of the modules which required application of open education software to design courseware, she asked her class of seven students to apply compendium in mounting the courseware. This was an important learning experience for the students who did not have prior knowledge of mind-maps. This was an experiential process as they came to know how to structure what is on the brain and put it on paper and then on software. More importantly was that in the process, the software failed and Anuradha had to seek help from the KMI team. This added their knowledge of software as they learnt how to fix problems when dealing with software. The outcome is that more than half the class did very well and they say they would use it in their own classroom setting.

Secondly, she has had an opportunity to collaborate with a home economics colleague to use OER in the conversion of a new curriculum for secondary education. This has come about in the process of promoting the concept of OER among her colleagues and showing them how open education software can be used to support creation of open courseware. Together with this colleague, they ran a two-week workshop with their students where they made effective use of available open source software in the conversion of a new curriculum for secondary. The participants (40 secondary educators - Home Economics) were first introduced to the identified open source software and thereon they had hands on working session to familiarise with the same. Further to that, they had to work in groups identifying the most appropriate content for conversion. An interesting observation made was that most of the participants did not have much prior knowledge about technology and least about open source resources. Therefore this experience exposed them to new skills they would use when they start practising in the classroom. Plans are to polish what the students created and send these resources the Ministry of Education for distribution to schools throughout the country.

 

Text extracted from pre-publication draft of report by Pauline Ngimwa, "Achieving impact in Africa through openness: OLnet TESSA Fellowships", March 2012. Full details of this publication will be available on this website when available.

Doris Kaije

OLnet-TESSA Fellow Doris Kaije

Image from DETA conference see: http://www.deta.up.ac.za/

Name

Doris Kaije

Project Title

Are Large Classes a Challenge to Implementing TESSA Materials in Rural Primary Schools in Uganda?

Project Summary

The introduction of universal primary education in Uganda has resulted in enrolment in Primary Schools doubling and in some cases tripling, making classes too large for teachers to manage. As a result   resources have become very few for all pupils to benefit and get quality education. Quality learning is limited and pupils in many schools leave primary education when they cannot read or write fluently. Ugandan government is already making efforts to improve quality by increasing the supply of text books and deploying more teachers to schools. However, having enough trained teachers to deal with large classes has remained a challenge. Teacher Education for Sub Saharan Africa (TESSA) in its effort to support education in Africa has developed open educational resources to be used by teachers in classroom. This study therefore was intended to find out whether large classes are a challenge in the use of TESSA materials. More focus was given on what impact TESSA materials are providing especially in areas that do not have good technological infrastructure. Hence the study was conducted in primary schools located in districts outside the main city.

This study has shown positive impact of TESSA materials and how they are used in large classes. Additionally, they have been used to make classes more learner-centred. Before they were introduced there was little learner participation. Many pupils listened to what the teacher said. Very few tried to answer questions asked in class and there was heavy reliance on teacher’s notes.  However, the findings of the study showed that after TESSA materials were introduced, teachers have learnt to use group methods and other skills to manage large classes. Pupils are able to study more on their own after being involved in group activities under the supervision of the teacher.

Dates visited the UK

Did not visit the UK

Institution

Kyambogo University, Uganda

Biographical information

Doris is a lecturer and teacher trainer at Kyambogo University, Uganda where she teaches bachelors and diploma students specializing in Ethics, World Religions and Gender studies in the Department of Religious studies and Philosophy. She has an interest in distance education and has been involved in a number of related activities in her university. This includes leading distance education programme activities for Diploma Education Primary students in one of the ten centres that support this program in the country as well as leading a team of writers for Religious Education  training and reading modules for distance learners in education. Additionally, she acts as the coordinator for the TESSA project which is located in the department of Distance Education.

She has published articles in a local journal and attended international conferences in Africa to improve her scholarly work as well as widen her professional network.

Doris holds a Master of Arts (Religious Studies) from Makerere University Uganda and is currently pursuing a PhD in the same University.

Main output

The main output of this research project is a report on how TESSA materials are being used in large classes in Uganda primary education.

Other output

Presentation at DETA Conference

References

Kaije, Doris (2011). Efforts made by African governments and challenges faced in education in changing circumstances: a case study of Uganda In: DETA Conference, 3-5 August, 2011, Maputo, Mozambique.

DETA Conference

Doris attended the conference and was able to present a paper on how her government is making efforts towards achieving quality education. Her paper argued that unless the real challenges faced by governments’ interventions are identified, there will be many initiatives with no desired impact and hence will fail. These challenges need to be identified so that appropriate solutions can be found. This also focused on how TESSA materials are part of these initiatives.

Doris also used this event to meet and discuss her research project with her fellowship mentor. She was encouraged to listen to what other fellows had achieved in their countries and was able to borrow ideas from them.

Update since fellowship

Besides carrying out the research project, Doris has been engaged in promoting and extending the use of TESSA materials among her colleagues, students and primary training colleges participating in the distance education program she is involved in.
 

Text extracted from pre-publication draft of report by Pauline Ngimwa, "Achieving impact in Africa through openness: OLnet TESSA Fellowships", March 2012. Full details of this publication will be available on this website when available.

Fred Keraro

Fred Keraro OLnet-TESSA Fellow

Image CC-BY Natalie Eggleston, OLnet

Name

Professor Fred Keraro

Project Title

The Readiness for Sustainable and Successful Use of OER in Higher Education in Kenya: A case study of Egerton University

Project Summary

This project was intended to develop a more detailed case study on the readiness to adopt OER by focusing on a single institution in a developing country.  His argument is that OER is one way of creating linkages with outside universities. This supports the Kenya government’s policy framework for education, training and research which states that university education and training should be of high quality, technologically informed and globally marketable (Republic of Kenya, 2005) . However, because production of OER has been dominated by a few Western and American institutions, developing countries like Kenya are faced with issues of sustainability and successful use of these resources in the process of adopting them in their education institutions. With this background, he hoped to investigate the following key aspects of OER adoption in his university:

  • What motivates academics to use OERs and what are the constraints.
  • Institutional Policy and Infrastructure in place to support the use of OERs.
  • How academics evaluate and select OERs.
  • The perceived benefits of using OERs.
  • Academics’ contribution at to the wider OER movement.

Dates visited the UK

15 to 27 May 2011

Institution

Egerton University, Kenya

Biographical information

Fred is an associate professor of science education in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Education and Management, Egerton University, Kenya. He is also the coordinator for Instructional Materials Development at the College of Open and Distance Learning and the Teacher Education in Sub-Saharan Africa (TESSA) project at the university.

Fred trained as a science teacher and taught in teacher training colleges before joining Egerton University. Early on in his teaching career, he started interrogating how culture affects the learning of science, hence his research interests and publications in culture and learning of science. He has recently concluded a research project on “Improving pupils’ cultural interpretations of scientific phenomena” which was sponsored by Kenya’s National Council of Science and Technology (NCST). He hopes to do further research on cultural interpretation surrounding reproduction and how this affects the learning of science.

Fred’s other responsibilities at the university include teaching science education courses as well as supervising masters and doctoral students. He has also served in various administrative committees. His research interests extend to environmental education, pedagogy and learning of science, open and distance education, and open education resources (OER).

His interest in OER came out of his involvement in the TESSA project as the coordinator. He has also actively been involved in the TESSA OER development, testing and usage and has participated in a number of TESSA workshops held at his university and in other African universities. It was through this involvement that he came to learn about the OLnet/TESSA fellowship program.

Main output

A report on Egerton university’s readiness to sustainably and successfully use  OER to be shared with academics and the University management

Other outputs

  • Presentation at DETA Pre-conference workshop
  • Preliminary analysis of a survey conducted in 12 primary schools collaborating with Egerton University

References

Wamutitu, Joseph M; Keraro, Fred N; Changeiywo, Johnson M and Jane Cullen (2011). The context of using TESSA OERs in Egerton University’s teacher education programmes. In: DETA pre-conference workshop, 3-5 August, 2011, Maputo, Mozambique.

DETA pre-conference workshop

Fred co-presented a paper entitled “The context of using OERs in Egerton’s teacher education program”. In this presentation, they looked at how TESSA OER have been integrated in pedagogy courses and the benefits to their Bachelor of Education (B.Ed) graduates. To illustrate these benefits, they presented three case studies of how OER are being used in different contexts. These case studies included a B.Ed graduate teacher in a rural school, a primary school head-teacher and a Teacher Advisory Centre tutor.

Besides making a presentation, Fred was interested in learning from other African colleagues how successful they were in using OER as well as learning how to identify and select quality resources. He wanted to learn how to identify OER from a myriad of online resources. This, he acknowledges was achieved. He had the opportunity to create networks, some of which he expects will develop into some future collaboration.

Fred also participated in chairing some of the workshop sessions.

Update since fellowship

Fred has now completed his research project and is about to finish compiling his research findings. He reckons that one of the major outcomes of the research is that it gave him an opportunity to engage more with his colleagues and learn their perceptions of OER, how they use them in teaching and the challenges they face. A key finding is that most of his colleagues were not aware of other OER beyond TESSA.

Besides carrying out the research, Fred has been actively involved in awareness activities as part of embedding and extending of TESSA activities in Egerton University. These activities have been in the form of three workshops. The first one was organised by his TESSA team as a sensitization workshop for stakeholders in basic education. This involved a total of 47 participants drawn from the Ministry of Education, Kenya Institute of Education and Centre for Mathematics, Science and Technology Education in Africa (CEMASTEA). Other participants included a provincial director of education and five district education officers along with their quality assurance officials and Teacher Advisory Centre tutors, and teachers and head teachers from 12 primary schools. During this workshop, the TESSA project was presented including how OER have been used at the university and schools they have collaborated with. Additionally, participants were shown how these resources can be mapped on the Kenyan school curriculum. This was a significant step towards creating an awareness of OER among basic education policymakers.

Following the success of this workshop, Fred has since been invited to talk about the TESSA OER in two other workshops. The first one was to a group of 90 primary school head teachers organised by the local District Education Officer. The other was organised by CEMASTEA where 31 members were present. CEMASTEA is in charge of in-service training of primary and secondary school science, mathematics and technology teachers and is present in Kenya and other African countries.

 

Text extracted from pre-publication draft of report by Pauline Ngimwa, "Achieving impact in Africa through openness: OLnet TESSA Fellowships", March 2012. Full details of this publication will be available on this website when available.

 

Dele Yaya

Dele Yaya OLnet-TESSA Fellow

Image CC-BY Natalie Eggleston, OLnet

Name

Dele Yaya

Project Title

Sustainable and Successful Use of OER in the Programmes of the National Teachers’ Institute, Nigeria

Project Summary

This project aimed at establishing the process of transforming NTI course materials into OER. NTI has been producing massive course materials in print and CDs since its inception in 1976. The institute has been integrating TESSA OER into the course books and continuing professional development (CPD) materials. However, there is a need to increase and sustain this integration so that teachers and other stakeholders can easily access the materials and repurpose for their use.  Already existing print and CD resources require to be transformed into OER materials. Users (i.e. primary school teachers) need to be supported to access and utilise OER in a sustainable manner. It is against this background that the project was designed.

The overarching project aim was to design a roadmap for this transformation. To achieve this aim, the following four key questions guided the investigation:

  • Why should NTI share her materials for free through OERs?
  • What NTI materials should be transformed into OERs and how?
  • What copyright, funding and other logistical issues need to be surmounted in transforming NTI materials into OERs?
  • What can NTI learn from the OU (OpenLearn) and from OER literature?

Dates visited the UK

15 to 27 May 2011

Institution

National Teachers’ Institute (NTI), Kaduna, Nigeria

Biographical information

Dele is the Deputy Director in charge of Planning, Research and Statistics and the TESSA Project Coordinator at NTI. He trained in teacher education with a specialisation in distance education and later did his PhD in educational technology. He has a long career at NTI where he has been a course writer for education and social studies and later state and zonal coordinator for the Institute’s distance education program at field centres before taking up his current administrative position. He is also the chairman of the implementation committee for the nation-wide Capacity Building Program for Teachers (under the Millennium Development Goals Project) which has annual week-long workshops with attendance rate of 120,000-140,000 teachers. Additionally, he is the NTI’s Desk Officer for the Joint Consultative Committee on Education (JCCE), a national policy making body on education matters.

His research interest is in open and distance education focusing on raising awareness around the use of OER. He is keen on ICT literacy, as he puts it: “because you cannot access OER online if you are not ICT literate”. He has been studying the processes other institutions have adopted in developing their OER so that NTI can learn from them for its own OER development process.

Dele has been involved in the TESSA project since 2009 when he participated in the Teacher Education at Maximum Scale (TEAMS) project. He has been part of the team that integrated TESSA materials in NTI courses and has been involved in the trial of these materials in the field. Additionally, he was part of the team that developed the TESSA handbook in a meeting in South Africa.

Main output

A roadmap for transforming NTI course materials into OER has been developed and it will be presented to the NTI management.

Other outputs

Presentation at DETA pre-conference workshop

References

Yaya, Dele (2011). Opening access to teacher education materials: Experience of the National Teachers’ Institute. In: DETA pre-conference workshop, 3-5 August, 2011, Maputo, Mozambique.

DETA pre-conference workshop

Dele attended this workshop and made a presentation titled “Opening access to teacher education materials: experience of the NTI”. This gave him the opportunity to talk about his project of transforming NTI course materials into OER. In his presentation, he highlighted the range of OER course materials, made a justification for why NTI is going this route and what this involves.
Some of the sessions were particularly informative. For example he found the demonstration of how to search for OER from the internet very useful. He states

“...maybe you have a topic and you want to get materials for it, there are millions of materials on the net. To be able to search and get those that are relevant to your course can be a challenge. This is one area that [presenter] helped us”.

The workshop also provided him with valuable insights from how others on the continent go about overcoming common challenges they encounter in adopting OER such as problems with access to technology, connectivity and power supply. It was also a time to meet fellow academics who he has interacted with previously.

Update since fellowship

Dele has been involved in a number of OER related activities. In the first place, he has now completed his project and developed the roadmap for transforming NTI course materials into OER. He is in the process of finalising his fellowship report. In the process of his project, he identified that the level of digital literacy among NTI staff and policy makers is quite low. Because of this, print format is still very prevalent. Poor internet connectivity does not help this situation.

He has also been working with his colleagues to create OER awareness at institutional and national levels, which according to him is a huge achievement. He notes that people are generally very excited about OER and are interested in using them. For example he has used his position as the NTI’s representative at the Joint Consultative Committee on education (JCCE). With his colleagues they have presented a memo entitled “promoting the use of OER for quality HE delivery” which was well received. The outcome of this is that very specific statements about integrating OER into the tertiary education will be made during the next meeting of the National Council on Education where ministers and commissioners ratify decisions of the JCCE. 

NTI has a radio station “The Teachers’ Radio” which offers a range of educational programmes to support schools, teachers and parents around Kaduna and future plans are to expand its coverage. Besides broadcasting TESSA audio programmes such as the “TESSA Teasers” and “Story Story” series, Dele and his TESSA team have been using this service to create awareness of OER and how they can be used.

Dele has also been actively involved in supporting the NTI Staff Primary School as a TESSA Demonstration School. This is a primary school that was opened on 29th November, 1984 as a welfare scheme for the staff of the Institute and is thus located on the campus of the Institute. As part of the Embedding and Extending TESSA project in Nigeria, the school is one of the strands of the project. The goal is to support the teachers in making good use of TESSA methodology. Dele has been using the skills he has acquired in the course of the fellowship towards supporting the school to act as a good testing ground for assessing the awareness, access, use and evaluation of TESSA OER and other relevant OER.

 

Text extracted from pre-publication draft of report by Pauline Ngimwa, "Achieving impact in Africa through openness: OLnet TESSA Fellowships", March 2012. Full details of this publication will be available on this website when available.